Dr. Sheri R. Noviello, Dean
Suite 4002E, Health Sciences and Business Administration Building

Dr. Byron LaGary Carter, Associate Dean of Health Sciences
Suite 4002C, Health Sciences and Business Administration Building

The College of Nursing and Health Sciences offers programs that lead to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (B.S.N.); a Master of Science in Nursing degree (M.S.N.); Bachelor of Science degrees in Exercise Physiology (B.S.E.P.) and Athletic Training (B.S.A.T.); an Associate of Applied Science degree program with a major in dental hygiene, offered in cooperation with Wiregrass Georgia Technical College; and a minor in Nutrition.

The baccalaureate program in nursing in the College of Nursing and Health Sciences is designed to give the student the basic knowledge, skills, and values that build upon the foundation provided by the University Core Curriculum and that are required for professional careers in nursing. Moreover, through a series of sequenced courses, the College of Nursing and Health Sciences prepares the student for advanced study in nursing. The curricula adhere to a systemic approach which emphasizes the connections between the concepts of Holism, Caring, Competence, Health, and Teaching/Learning. The College offers a curriculum for Registered Nurse applicants leading to the B.S.N. or to both the B.S.N. and M.S.N. Please contact the college directly for information about this curriculum.

The College’s programs stress the importance of critical thinking skills, an appreciation for diverse cultural perspectives, and the application of knowledge to address policy disputes and social problems related to health care. The program leading to the baccalaureate degree in nursing is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing. This program provides a major measure of eligibility for the national licensing examination in nursing, leading to use of the title Registered Nurse. Applicants who have a conviction for a felony may not be eligible for licensure; it is recommended that these applicants consult with the Dean of the College before seeking entrance to the program. Both the bachelor’s degree (B.S.N.) and the master’s degree (M.S.N.) programs in the College of Nursing are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education [One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: 202-887-6791 Fax: 202-887-8476].

The Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology (B.S.E.P.) degree prepares students to work in a wide variety of settings, such as cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, corporate fitness/wellness, hospital health promotion and outpatient rehabilitation, human performance laboratories, and private practice. Students are involved in classroom, laboratory, clinical, and field experiences that include theoretical and hands-on activities in clinical and non-clinical settings that often include health appraisal and education, exercise testing and prescription, and administrative leadership skills. Graduates are prepared for and encouraged to seek certification through the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Society of Exercise Physiologists (ASEP), and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). The degree also provides a strong foundation for advanced or professional studies in exercise physiology, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and related areas. Students interested in further study in these areas are responsible for satisfying specific admission requirements in those programs.

The Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training (B.S.A.T.) degree is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Successful completion of the degree program qualifies the student to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam. An individual posting a passing score on the exam is recognized as a Certified Athletic Trainer by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) and is eligible to apply for state licensure and work as an athletic trainer in clinical and school settings, professional sports, and colleges and universities. Students in the program receive training under the direct supervision of one of the institution’s BOC-certified athletic trainers in the areas of injury prevention, pathology of illnesses and injuries, assessment and evaluation, care of acute injuries and illnesses, pharmacology, therapeutic exercise and modalities, psychosocial intervention and referral, health care administration, and professional responsibilities.

Students may have the opportunity to gain work experience relating to their major, clarify their career goals, and earn money to help finance their education through the VSU Cooperative Education Program. Co-op students are placed, on a competitive basis, in work assignments within health care institutions. Interested students should contact the VSU Office of Cooperative Education (telephone 229-333-7172).

Grade Point Average Requirement for Pre-Nursing Majors

Students entering the University directly from high school may declare a major in pre-nursing. In order to continue as a pre-nursing major, students must maintain a GPA of 2.8 or higher on all course work undertaken. If in any given semester a student’s overall GPA falls below 2.8, the student will have one academic term to bring it back up to or above 2.8. If the overall GPA remains below 2.8 for two consecutive semesters, the student will be requested to change majors. Any student who fails to respond to that request will automatically be transferred to an undeclared major status.

Students who enter the University as transfer students who wish to declare a major in pre-nursing must have a GPA of at least 2.8 on all course work undertaken. Upon acceptance as a pre-nursing major, a student must maintain a 2.8 overall GPA as described above.

Students changing majors from another program within the University must also have at least a 2.8 overall GPA to transfer to the pre-nursing major and will be subject to the same maintenance requirements already described.

Athletic Training

HSAT 2050. Introduction to Athletic Training. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Declared Athletic Training major. Basic information concerning the admissions criteria, process, and retention requirements, the athletic training education program; and the profession of athletic training. Students eligible for admission into the program may take the course.

HSAT 3020. Assessments in Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. Development of knowledge, skills, and abilities in selecting, administering, and interpreting standardized health, athletic, and physiological-related physical fitness tests, performance test.

HSAT 3200. Nutrition for Health and Human Performance. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites or Co-requisite: HSAT 3420 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor. Prerequisites by Program: Exercise Physiology majors must have met program entry requirements. Health and Physical Education majors must have been admitted into the program and passed KSPE 2999. Admitted Athletic Training students and nutrition minors may be allowed to take the course with the approval of the program coordinator and the instructor. An introduction to the characteristics of the essential dietary nutrients and their respective roles in the body. Emphasis is placed on the effects of nutritional practices on health and human performance.

HSAT 3420. Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in BIOL 2651. Exercise Physiology majors must have met program entry requirements. Health and physical education majors' prerequisite: KSPE 2999. Athletic Training majors may be allowed to take the course with approval of the program coordinator and the instructor. An understanding of how the body, from a functional standpoint, responds, adjusts, and adapts to exercise. Topics include bioenergetics, neuromuscular concepts, cardiorespiratory considerations, physical training, and environmental concerns involving physical activity, athletic performance, and health-related fitness.

HSAT 3430. Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Acceptance to the Exercise Physiology Program and grade of "C" or better in BIOL 2651. Athletic Training majors must have completed KSPE 2050 with a grade of "C" or better and should register for KSPE 3430 section B. Basic physical concepts as they apply to human movement are explored. Structural anatomy, neuromuscular physiology and biomechanical principles as they apply to sport skills and fitness activities are emphasized.

HSAT 3440. Athletic Training Clinical Competencies I. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. A study of manipulative and motor skills required to perform athletic training techniques in clinical settings. Techniques reflect those presented in lecture/lab courses that were taught the previous semesters. The course also involves a semester-long clinical education component.

HSAT 3441. Athletic Training Clinical Competencies II. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. A study of manipulative and motor skills required to perform athletic training techniques in clinical settings. Techniques reflect those presented in lecture/lab courses taught the previous semesters. The course also involves a semester-long clinical education component.

HSAT 3500. Athletic Training Special Topics. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. A flexible course of study dealing with current events or special topics in athletic training. The course is designed to prepare graduating athletic training majors to address current and contemporary issues within the athletic training profession.

HSAT 4250. Organization and Administration Strategies in Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2050. A study of management techniques used in typical athletic training settings. General topics areas to include facility design, human resource management, information processing, and financial management techniques. Athletic injury insurance and legal considerations in athletic training will also be covered.

HSAT 4300. Foundations of Injury Prevention and Care. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: KSPE 2050 completed with a grade of "C" or better. Provides the student with knowledge concerning sports injury prevention, treatment, and taping skills. Emphasis is placed on protocols common in the athletic training profession.

HSAT 4350. Evaluation and Assessment of Upper and Lower Extremities. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. Advanced principles addressing athletic injuries that commonly occur to the head, neck, trunk, and upper and lower extremities with regard to evaluation protocol and tests.

HSAT 4360. Evaluation and Assessment of Head, Neck, and Trunk. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Education Program. Advanced principles addressing athletic injuries that commonly occur to the head, neck, trunk, and upper and lower extremities with regard to evaluation protocol and tests.

HSAT 4400. Therapeutic Modalities and Pharmacology in Athletic Training. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Education Program. An introduction to basic rehabilitation principles in the athletic training profession in addition to the use of therapeutic modalities and pharmacology agents available in this process.

HSAT 4440. Athletic Training Clinical Competencies III. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. A study of manipulative and motor skills required to perform athletic training techniques in clinical settings. Techniques reflect those presented in lecture/lab courses taught the previous semesters. The course also involves a semester-long clinical education component.

HSAT 4441. Athletic Training Clinical Competencies IV. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. A study of manipulative and motor skills required to perform athletic training techniques in clinical settings. Techniques reflect those presented in lecture/lab courses taught the previous semesters. The course also involves a semester-long clinical education component.

HSAT 4442. Athletic Training Clinical Competencies V. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic training Education Program. A study of manipulative and motor skills required to perform athletic training techniques in clinical settings. Techniques reflect those presented in lecture/lab courses that were taught the previous semesters. The course also requires a semester-long clinical education component.

HSAT 4443. Athletic Training Clinical Competencies VI. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. A study of manipulative and motor skills required to perform athletic training techniques in clinical settings. Techniques reflect those presented in lecture/lab courses that were taught the previous semesters. The course also requires a semester-long clinical education component.

HSAT 4450. Sport Related Illness and Conditions. 3 Hours.

Investigation signs, symptoms, and treatments of illnesses and conditions common to athletes but not addressed in previous athletic training courses.

HSAT 4490. Rehabilitation Techniques in Athletic Training. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Education Program. Provides the student with the knowledge needed to develop comprehensive rehabilitation programs. The development of therapeutic goals and objectives, exercise graduation and methods of evaluating rehabilitation progress will be stressed.

HSAT 4491. Procedures and Protocols in Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admissions to the Athletic Training Program. Application of a variety of clinical procedures and protocols used in the athletic training profession.

HSAT 4600. Athletic Training Ethics and Psychosocial issues. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program or consent of instructor. A study of the knowledge and skills that certified athletic trainers must possess to recognize the sociocultural, mental, emotional and physical behaviors of those involved in physical activity for intervention and referral. Recognizing professional responsibilities is also stressed.

HSAT 4700. Athletic Training Professional Practice Seminar. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission in the Athletic Training Program. Reflection on the educational and clinical competencies. Students discuss and prepare for the BOC exam.

Exercise Physiology

HSEP 3010. Exercise Testing and Prescription I. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3020 and HSEP 3420. A concentrated study of the principles of exercise testing and prescription for the apparently healthy adult including the health appraisal, risk assessment and interpretation of data. The American College of Sports Medicine exercise guidelines are emphasized.

HSEP 3011. Exercise Testing and Prescription II. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3010. A continuation of HSEP 3010, with emphasis on cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic disease; the role the mechanism of action for medications such as alpha and beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors, nitrated, peripheral vasodilators, and diuretics. Additional classifications to be reviewed include inotropic, anti-arrhythmic, anti-thrombosis, lipid-lowering, hypo/hyperglycemic, anti-inflammatory, and bronchodilators.

HSEP 3020. Assessments in Exercise Physiology. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Exercise Physiology Program. Development of knowledge, skills, and abilities in selecting, administering, and interpreting standardized health, athletic, and physiological-related physical fitness tests.

HSEP 3050. Care and Prevention of Exercise-Related Injuries. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3430. Basic knowledge, skills, and abilities required for the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of common injuries related to physical activity.

HSEP 3200. Nutrition for Health and Human Performance. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: HSEP 3420 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor and Exercise Physiology Program Coordinator if admitted Nutriton minor. An introdution to the characteristics of the essential dietary nutrients and their respective roles in the body. Emphasis is placed on the effects of nutritional practices on health and human performance.

HSEP 3360. Chronic Disease Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Acceptance to the Exercise Physiology Program. Introduction to the distribution and determinants of chronic diseases in the population. Causal relationships laying the groundwork for programs of prevention and control emphasized. Commonly used epidemiological statistics and research methods discussed.

HSEP 3420. Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Exercise physiology. An understanding of how the body, from a functional standpoint, responds, adjusts, and adapts to exercise. Topics include bioenergetics, neuromuscular concepts, cardiorespiratory considerations, physical training, and environmental concerns involving physical activity, athletic performance, and health-related fitness.

HSEP 3430. Structural Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. Basic physical concepts as they apply to human movement are explored. Structural anatomy, neuromuscular physiology and biomechanical principles as they apply to sport skills and fitness activities are emphasized.

HSEP 3650. Resistance and Training Program Development. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3410 and HSEP 3430. Development, instruction, supervision, and evaluation of muscular fitness and flexibility programs for diverse populations and settings using a variety of training modalities. Based upon competencies required for ACSM, NATA, and MSCA certifications.

HSEP 4040. Pediatric Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3420. The physiological differences between children and adults relative to exercise performance. Variables such as size, biomechanics, neuromuscular, reproductive, hormonal, and cardiovascular-respiratory differences will be examined.

HSEP 4070. Exercise Cardiopulmonary Physiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3420 and HSEP 3360. A concentrated study in the exercise physiology of the healthy and diseased cardiopulmonary system. Emphasis on cardiopulmonary adaptations to acute and chronic exercise and on normal versus abnormal conditions and their effects on exercise testing and training.

HSEP 4080. Exercise Electrocardiography. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3420. A basic understanding of the 12-lead electrocardiogram as it relates to graded exercise testing, training, and functional evaluation. The course is designed particularly to assist the clinical exercise physiologist in developing the skills required for quickly identifying electrocardiographic patterns at rest and during exercise.

HSEP 4130. Exercise Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3011, and HSEP 4080. A study of multi-phasic and multi-disciplinary programs designed to restore to a productive life the individual with cardiopulmonary disease. Common medical treatments and diagnostic procedures and treatments reviewed. Emphasis on the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation guidelines.

HSEP 4210. Clinical Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3010, and HSEP 4070. An advanced course in the physiology of exercise as it relates to the clinical exercise physiologist or health care professional. The integration of the body's various systems relative to the prevention and therapeutic role of exercise will be examined. Case study assignments will focus on problem-oriented management of subjective and objective data.

HSEP 4510. Exercise Physiology Practicum. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in HSEP 3010, 3011, 3020, 3050, 3420, and 4080. Students must also have a completed graduation checklist returned from the Registrar and current CPR card. A laboratory capstone course for evaluation, review, and mastery of the competencies required for the clinical and applied exercise physiologist per ACSM guidelines prior to enrollment in HSEP 4550.

HSEP 4550. Exercise Physiology Internship. 12 Hours.

Pre-requisites: A grade of "C" or better in all course requirements for the Exercise Physiology Bachelors of Science degree except HSEP 4550; current AHA Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers CPR certification; current liability insurance; and any other requirements specific to internship site. The student is required to work 40 hours per week for a minimum of 10 weeks, or 400 cumulative hours. Students must complete a major project or paper related to some aspect of the internship site, teach at least two educational classes, and submit a weekly log of their daily activities. The internship site must reflect an area directly related to the field of clinical or applied exercise physiology. Each student is required to sit for at least one of the following professional certification examinations: American College of Sports Medicine Health Fitness Specialist or Clinical Exercise Specialist prior to the end of the semester in which the course is taken and submit copies of the certification exam results, preceptor evaluation, and an exit survey to the course instructor before an final grade can be assigned.

Health Science

HSHS 3000. Introduction to Healthcare Professional Practice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. An introduction to healthcare professions and the various elements and components of each healthcare profession that makes it unique. Students are provided with information necessary to find employment in each healthcare profession. Emphasis will include training requirements, job responsibilities, salaries, and elements specific to each health profession.

HSHS 3100. Structural Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. Basic physical concepts as they apply to human movement are explored. Structural anatomy, neuromuscular physiology, and biomechanical principles as they apply to human movement are emphasized.

HSHS 3300. Health Assessment and Promotion. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. This course is an introduction to the process of systematic and comprehensive health data collection and assessment across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on strategies for interpersonal communication as well as gathering and assessment of data from examination techniques. Also focuses on the examination of a patient's health risk and provision of interventions to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors and disease prevention.

HSHS 3350. Medical Disease and Illness. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. This course is a survey of disabilities, illnesses, and medical conditions across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the signs, symptoms, assessments, treatments, and preventative techniques associated with specific illnesses and medical conditions. In addition, course content will also focus on current information provided by the most recent Healthy People data.

HSHS 3600. Documentation, Terminology, and Coding in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. An introduction to healthcare documentation and medical terminology. Medical Coding will also be introduced.

HSHS 3700. Principles of Pharmacology and Diagnostic Testing. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. This course offers a concise introduction to pharmacological concepts for students in healthcare professions. Emphasis will include effects, indications, contraindications, and adverse effects. The course will also focus on common imaging modalities and their use is assessing, monitoring, and treating conditions seen by healthcare professionals.

HSHS 3800. Evidence Based Practice in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. An introduction to various essential concepts and components associated with the evidence-based practice process in health-related professions,.

HSHS 3900. Current Trends and Issues in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. An exploration of current issues and trends in healthcare to include issues across the lifespan.

HSHS 4050. Principles of Musculoskeletal Examination. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of HSHS 3100 with a grade of "C" or better. Examination of commonly occurring musculoskeletal injuries and conditions common in a physically active population.

HSHS 4100. Fitness and Strength and Conditioning Techniques. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. A survey of the mechanisms by which the body responds, reacts, and adapts to physical exercise. Includes a study of how to select, apply, gather, assess, and interpret data from physical assessments related to performance. In addition, the course provides knowledge about selection, application, and progression of fitness, strength, and conditioning techniques to improve performance.

HSHS 4300. Professionalism and Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. The course provides students with information related to identifying and developing professional behaivors in healthcare professions. Information regarding assessing professional behavior and challenging unprofessional behavior will be addressed,.

HSHS 4500. Communication and Cutlural Competence in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. Introduces students to the fundamental principles for the effective communication with patients, families, and significant others of the patient. The course focuses on patient-centered approaches for promoting, improving, and maintaining dialogue with patients. Effective communication has been shown to be central to patient satisfaction, professional satisfaction patient adherence to treatment plans, and positive outcomes for the patient. Additional exploration of how cultural backgrounds of patients and providers impact the healthcare encounter. Examines how clinical healthcare settings and organizations can act as barriers to providing effective services to diverse communities.

HSHS 4650. Exercise Programming. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of HSHS 4100 and 3350 with a grade of "C" or better. This course focuses on the selection and application of exercise prescriptions for patients across the lifespan, including those with disease and illness. Emphasis is placed on creating an exercise prescription that is baed on the patient's current health status, goals, and applied health tests and measurements.

HSHS 4800. Principles of Therapeutic Intervention. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of Progression Requirements of Professional Program. An introduction to basic rehabilitation priciples in healthcare professions.

Nursing

NURS 2700. Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: BIOL 2651 and BIOL 2652. A study of cellular concepts, organ systems, and holistic aspects of health and disease. The course relates normal body physiological function to pathological changes that occur as a result of disease, compensatory mechanisms made by the body, and adaptive lifestyles strategies. Integration of developmental and preventive aspects of health across the age continuum is included.

NURS 3020. Biological and Chemical Terrorism: Impact on Communities. 3 Hours.

A study designed for health care and public service professionals to develop an understanding of the implications of biological and chemical terrorism and to identify the potential risks these agents have in communities. Discussion will focus on understanding federal, state, and local resources for planning and management of community exposure. Courses participants will implement a disaster plan during a simulated drill. Open to students of all majors.

NURS 3030. Women's Health and Nutritional Issues. 3 Hours.

Also offered as WGST 3030. An introduction to the holistic health care and nutritional needs of women throughout their lifespan. Health care and nutrition issues are discussed from historical and contemporary perspectives. The course explores self-care practices of culturally diverse women, including health maintenance, illness prevention, and complementary healing.

NURS 3050. Field Study in Transcultural Care. 1-8 Hours.

Focuses on the application of concepts of transcultural nursing in selected culturally diverse settings. Students are encouraged to explore personal cultural orientation and its influence on the delivery of care and services. Selected ethnocultural groups will be studied. Variability will occur in undergraduate and graduate study intensity (concentration and length of study.

NURS 3060. Special Topics in Nursing. 1-5 Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. An intensive study of an aspect of nursing care.

NURS 3070. Health Care Issues of Vulnerable Populations in the U.S.. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or 1160 or permission of instructor. Course is open to all majors. An examination of the historical, cultural, social, and political issues that render certain populations in the U.S. vulnerable to ill health. The course utilizes appropriate theories to study these issues, with emphasis on ameliorating the health of vulnerable populations. It will examine issues related to health care access and policies and programs developed to reduce risks of disease and injury. It is also designed to raise awareness of the disparities in health among certain groups, including the poor, ethnic minorities, high risk women and children, the homeless, the uninsured and underinsured, among others.

NURS 3080. Strategies for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Strategies for identification and interpretation of evidence for nursing and healthcare protocols. Variables affecting care of vulnerable and at-risk populations in south Georgia, and participation in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data generated in acute care and community-based healthcare settings will be examined.

NURS 3102. Pharmacology in Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Full admission to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Safe dosage calculation and pharmacotherapy, including pharmacological and parenteral agents, actions, therapeutic benefits, side effects, client response, and nursing implications.

NURS 3103. Health Assessment Across the Lifespan. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Full admission to the College on Nursing and Health Sciences. Assessment of physical, psychosocial, functional, and environmental status. Focus is on health assessment of individuals across the lifespan. Concepts and techniques of assessment, including therapeutic communication, critical thinking, and interprofessional relationship, are introduced, practiced, and evaluated in the classroom and laboratory experiences.

NURS 3104. RN-BSN Pathophysiology for the Practicing Nurse. 3 Hours.

An overview of pathophysiology of selected conditions of the human organism across the lifespan focusing on the etiology, pathogenesis, physiological changes, and clinical manifestations of common health problems. The influence of genetics, ethnicity, environment, and age will be explored.

NURS 3105. RN-BSN Professional Nursing Development I. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Core curriculum and admission to VSU College of Nursing. Foundations of professional nursing development, including history, theory, education, research, and practice. Transformation of self and others begins through reflective practice, therapeutic communication, critical thinking, and professional relationships.

NURS 3106. RN-BSN Health Assessment Across the Lifespan. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of NURS 3104 and 3105 with a grade of "C" or better. Assessment of physical, psychosocial, functional, and environmental status. Focus is on health assessment of individuals across the lifespan. Concepts emphasize refinement of health history and physical assessment techniques, recognition of normal findings, and differentiation of normal form common abnormal findings.

NURS 3111. Nursing Care I: Health Promotion and Competencies. 8 Hours.

Prerequisite: Full admission status to College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Prerequisites or Corequisites: NURS 3103. Individual health promotion and illness prevention across the lifespan, includes an overview of nursing history, theory, education, research, and practice. Fundamental nursing skills and concepts, including medication administration skills, are introduced, practiced, and evaluated in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting.

NURS 3201. Professional Nursing Development I: Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Junior I courses. Development of skills in reading, interpreting, and evaluating nursing and health care research to become knowledgeable consumers in evidence-based nursing practice. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodology research designs are studied as they apply to the development, dissemination, and utilization of research studies in the practice of professional nursing.

NURS 3202. Mental Health Nursing Care. 5 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Junior I courses. Evidence-based practice for the psychosocial care of self and other across the lifespan. Students actively engaged in an exploration of behavioral health issues, including ethical, legal, cultural, public policy, and safety issues. Clinical experiences within an interdisciplinary team are used to provide client-centered care.

NURS 3203. Nursing Care II: Acute Health Alterations. 7 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Junior I courses. The application and integration of holistic nursing care of clients with acute, physiologic health alterations. Content builds upon foundational concepts and basic nursing skills to care for adults and families. Clinical experiences within interdisciplinary teams provide the opportunity to assist clients to attain optimal health.

NURS 3210. Mental Health Nursing Care. 5 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of all Junior I semester courses. Evidence-based practice for the psychosocial care of self and others across the lifespan. Students are actively engaged in an exploration of behavioral health issues, including ethical, legal, cultural, public policy, and safety issues. Clinical experiences within an interdisciplinary team area used to provide client-centered care.

NURS 3212. Nursing Care II: Acute Health Alterations. 7 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Junior I courses. The application and integration of holistic nursing care of clients with acute, physiologic health alterations. Content builds upon foundational concepts and basic nursing skills to care for children, adults, and families. Clinical experiences within interdisciplinary teams provide the opportunity to assist clients to attain optimal health.

NURS 3214. Health and Well-Being in Older Adults. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: All Junior semester I courses or permission of the instructor. Health promotion and aging in older adults. This course integrates developmental aspects and theories of aging to promote well-being.

NURS 3216. RN-BSN Health and Well-Being of Older Adults. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: NURS 3106 with a grade of "C" or better. Health promotion and aging in older adults. This course integrates developmental aspects and theories of aging to promote well-being.

NURS 3220. Community as Client. 5 Hours.

Prerequisites; NURS 3110, NURS 3130, NURS 3100, NURS 3100K. Co-requisites: NURS 3211 and NURS 3221. Focus is on the community as client. Establishes a foundation of the global organizational structure of community. Emphasizes promotion and maintenance of optimal health throughout the life cycle. Laboratory experiences provide the opportunity to practice health promotion in a variety of settings. Open to non-nursing majors with permission.

NURS 3240. Introduction to Forensic Nursing. 3 Hours.

The application of the principles of forensic science, nursing science, and other knowledge to the nursing care of patients. Public and legal communities are explored.

NURS 3250. Society, Wellness, and Illness. 3 Hours.

Cultural diversity and the relationships among societal practices, ethnicity, religion, wellness, and illness. The course explores the connection between social settings, and health/illness practices, including folk remedies and other traditional health practices.

NURS 3800. Student Success: Problem-Based Learning. 3 Hours.

Specific teaching/learning activities aimed at improving academic performance among at-risk nursing students. Students will engage in problem-based learning in order to strengthen their skills of holistic assessment; expression of caring and empowerment of clients; and critical thinking ability to provide safe, efficient, and compassionate professional nursing care.

NURS 3900. Student Success: Clinical Applications in Problem-based Learning. 3 Hours.

Specific teaching/learning clinical activities aimed at clinical and academic performance among at-risk nursing students. Students will engage in problem-based learning in a clinical environment in order to strengthen their skills of holistic assessment; expression of caring and empowerment of clients; and their ability to provide safe, efficient, and compassionate professional nursing care.

NURS 3990. Palliative and End-of-Life Care. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Successfully completion of J1 courses. A study of the palliative care, the dying process, death and grieving across cultures and developmental life stages. The course focuses on end-of-life issues including physical care, cultural and spiritual perspectives, and legal/ethical concerns related to quality of life decisions.

NURS 4010. Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Care. 3 Hours.

Introduces aspects of bioethics, organizational, legal and healthcare ethical issues with particular emphasis on aspects of law that serve as regulations and principles to govern ethical business practices in the healthcare industry.

NURS 4060. Advanced Health Assessment. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Licensure as a Registered Nurse or permission of faculty. Focuses on advanced comprehensive assessment skills utilized in a variety of clinical settings. Builds on basic and experiential knowledge of health assessment. Emphasis is placed on applying critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning skills in assessing, diagnosing, and monitoring the health status of adult clients and families. Clinical practicum will focus on the application of these advanced assessment skills. Note: This course or demonstrated competency in the content of this course is required for admission to the graduate program.

NURS 4070. Directed Study in Nursing. 1-5 Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. Special study in an area of nursing of special interest to the student under the direction of selected faculty.

NURS 4102. Professional Nursing Development II: Research and Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Junior I courses. Development of skills in reading, interpreting, and evaluating nursing and health care research to become knowledgeable consumers in evidence-based nursing practice. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodology research designs are studied as they apply to the development, dissemination, and utilization of research studies in the practice of professional nursing.

NURS 4104. RN-BSN Nursing Informatics. 3 Hours.

An examination and application of information technology to decision making in client care. The course focuses on concepts of informatics and the use of Health Care Systems.

NURS 4105. RN-BSN Professional Nursing Development II: Research and Evidence Based Practices. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: NURS 3105 with a grade of "C" or better. Development of skills in reading, interpreting, and evaluating nursing and health care research to become knowledgeable consumers in evidence-based nursing practice. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodology research designs are studied as they apply to the development, dissemination, and utilization of research studies in the practice of professional nursing.

NURS 4113. Nursing Care III: Chronic and Multisystem Health Alterations. 7 Hours.

Prerequisite: All Junior 2 courses. Application and integration of holistic nursing care of clients with chronic and multisystem, physiologic health alterations. Content builds upon concepts and nursing skills acquired in previous courses to care for children, adults, and families. Clinical experiences within interdisciplinary teams provide the opportunity to assist clients to attain optimal health.

NURS 4114. Nursing Care III: Chronic and Multisystem Alterations. 7 Hours.

Prerequisites: NURS 3202 and NURS 3203. The application and integration of holistic nursing care of clients with chronic and multisystem, physiologic health alterations. Content builds upon concepts and nursing skills acquired in previous courses to care for adults and families. Clinical experiences within interdisciplinary teams provide the opportunity to assist clients to attain optimal health.

NURS 4123. Nursing Care of Women, Neonates, and Childbearing Families. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: NURS 3212. Focus on nursing theories and skills related to culturally competent health promotion and maintenance for women, childbearing families, and neonates. Clinical experiences provide opportunities to perform and evaluate nursing support to women, childbearing families, and neonates.

NURS 4124. Nursing Care of Women, Children, and Families. 8 Hours.

Prerequisites: NURS 3202 and NURS 3203. Nursing theories and skills related to culturally competent health promotion and maintenance for women, children, and families. Incorporates concepts of family-centered care, collaboration, patient safety, quality improvement, and informatics, utilizing and evidence-based practice approach. Clinical experiences provide opportunities to perform and evaluate nursing practice for women, children, and families.

NURS 4200. Community Health Nursing Care. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Senior I courses. Focus on community as client. Emphasis is on holistic nursing car to promote and preserve health of culturally diverse families, groups, and populations in the community. Clinical experiences provide opportunities to collaborate with community agencies to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate services.

NURS 4201. Community Health Nursing Care. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Senior I courses. A study emphasizing holistic nursing care to promote and preserve the health of culturally diverse families, groups, and populations in the community. Clinical experiences provide opportunities to collaborate with community agencies to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate services.

NURS 4202. Professional Nursing Development II: Leadership and Management. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Senior I courses. Preparation for the transition from student to professional nurse, focusing on the development of leadership skills and the introduction of management concepts and competencies.

NURS 4203. Professional Nursing Development III: Leadership and Management. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of all senior I courses. Preparation for the transition from student to professional nurse, focusing on the development of leadership skills and the introduction of management concepts. Emphasis is on building leadership and management competencies in organizing and coordinating the delivery of nursing care through communication, teamwork, accountability, delegation, problem-solving, client safety and quality management, and evidence-based practice within the context of health care systems and organizations.

NURS 4204. RN-BSN Community Health Nursing Care. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of NURS 3104, 3105, 3106, 3216, 4104 and 4105 with a grade of "C" or better. A study of holistic nursing care to promote and preserve the health of culturally diverse families, groups, and populations in the community.

NURS 4205. RN-BSN Professional Nursing Development III: Leadership & Management. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: NURS 3105 and 4105 with a grade of "C" or better. Preparation for the transition from student to professional nurse, focusing on the development of leadership skills and the introduction of management concepts. Emphasis is on building leadership and management competencies in organizing and coordinating the delivery of nursing care through communication, teamwork, accountability, delegation, problem-solving, client safety, and quality management, and evidence-based practice within the context of health care systems and organizations.

NURS 4224. Professional Nursing Practice. 8 Hours.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Senior I courses. Prerequisites or Corequisites: Senior 2 courses. A comprehensive course combining directed conceptual review, professional nursing practice, and simulation to develop students' abilities to manage care for a group of clients that approximates a beginning professional nurse's workload.

NURS 4225. Professional Nursing Practice. 7 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of all senior semester 1 courses. Co-requisite: Senior 2 courses. Capstone course combining professional nursing practice, seminars, and simulation to develop students' abilities to manage care for a group of clients that approximates a beginning professional nurse's workload.

NURS 4226. RN-BSN Professional Nursing Practice. 5 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of all other RN-BSN curriculum with a grade of "C" or better. A capstone course combining nursing theory, online discussions, clinical practice, and experiential learning activities. The course emphasizes professional nursing care of individuals, groups, and populations at the point of care.

NURS 4250. Introduction to Nursing Financial Management. 3 Hours.

A broad introduction to nursing financial concepts, issues, tools, and vocabulary. Topics include financial statement analysis, working capital management, budgeting, cost finding, and rate setting. Minimal accounting proficiency is expected.

NURS 4400. Nursing Informatics. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: BVED 2400 or CS 1000. Analyzes concepts related to health care informatics and information technologies in health care. Provides students with opportunities to develop theoretical knowledge and enhance technology skills through laboratory application of didactic content.

Nutrition

NUTR 3100. Applied Nutritional Science. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: BIOL 2651; Pre- or Co-requisite: BIOL 2652. Introduction to essential dietary nutrients and their metabolic functions. Students will explore the biochemical and physiological responses to macro and micronutrients and apply nutritional science to dietary choices for health promotion.

NUTR 3250. Special Topics in Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Basic nutrition course or permission of Instructor. An intensive study in any area of student interest related to nutrition or a current topic relevant to nutritional science or complementary nutrition care. Topics may vary depending on selected area of nutrition.

NUTR 3300. Nutrition, Fitness, and Health. 3 Hours.

Basic nutrients and their role in fitness and health. This course focuses on the effect of nutrients and foods on physical fitness and health.

NUTR 3350. Weight Management and Behavior. 3 Hours.

Assessment and interventions for management of unhealthy weights. Emphasis is on the relationship between weight and health problems. The role of behavior change and nutritional strategies in health promotion will be discussed.

NUTR 4000. Advanced Nutritional Therapy. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: NUTR 3100 or permission of instructor. Nutritional assessment and interventions for health management in hospital and community settings. Emphasis is on therapeutic diets and physiologic responses to individual nutrients in the treatment of acute and chronic disease.

NUTR 4900. Lifecycle Nutrition. 3 Hours.

The study of nutritional needs from birth through old age. Emphasis is on factors that influence nutritional requirements for growth and development, maturation, and aging.

NUTR 4950. Community Nutrition and Health. 3 Hours.

Role of nutrition policy and research in community health and nutrition programs. Emphasis is placed on application and utilization of tools to assess, analyze, and develop programs to meet the nutrition and health needs of communities.