TBA, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Room 107, West Hall

Academic Support Services (Access Office, Student Success Center, Office of Testing, Centralized Advising)

Academic Policies and Procedures (Withdrawal from Courses Policies, Change in Major Program, Course or Prerequisite Substitutions and Waivers, Absence Regulations, Auditing Classes, Mid-term GradesFinal Examinations, Grading System, Academic Renewal Policy, Academic Probation and Suspension, Work by Correspondence and Extensions, Academic Dishonesty)

Advising and Registration (Academic Advising, Preparation for Professional Schools, Second Baccalaureate Degree, Minors, Classification, Academic Load, Course Numbering, Determination of Credit Hours, Registration, Graduation Requirements for Undergraduates, Foreign Language RequirementRecognition of Undergraduate Superior AchievementStudent Records, Transcript Policy, Diploma Replacement, Enrolling at Another Institution as a Transient Student)

International Programs and Initiatives (Center for International Programs, Study Abroad Opportunities, Foreign Student Advisor, VSU International Initiatives)

This catalog is prepared for the convenience of faculty and students and is not to be construed as an official publication of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. In case of any divergence from or conflict with the Bylaws or Policies of the Board of Regents, the official Bylaws and Policies of the Board of Regents shall prevail.

Academic operations are broadly supervised by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who is in turn supported by the deans and directors of the several colleges and divisions. Department heads report to the appropriate dean or director of their college or division. The University consists of colleges and divisions with their respective departments as follows:

The College of Arts and Sciences: Departments of Biology; Chemistry; English; History; Mathematics and Computer Science; Modern and Classical Languages; Philosophy and Religious Studies; Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences; Political Science; and Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice.

The Harley Langdale, Jr. College of Business Administration: Departments of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Management and Healthcare Administration, and Marketing and International Business.

The James L. and Dorothy H. Dewar College of Education and Human Services: Departments of Adult and Career Education; Communication Sciences and Disorders; Curriculum, Leadership, and Technology; Early Childhood and Special Education; Kinesiology and Physical Education; Marriage and Family Therapy; Library and Information Sciences; Middle, Secondary, Reading, and Deaf Education; Psychology and Counseling; and Social Work.

The College of the Arts: Departments of Art, Music, and Communication Arts.

The College of Nursing and Health Sciences: Departments of Undergraduate Nursing and Graduate Nursing; Exercise Physiology; and Athletic Training.

The Graduate School: All departments offering or participating in graduate programs.

The Divisions of Aerospace Studies and Extended Learning.

Academic Support Services

Centralized Advising

Advising is an important and integral component of a student’s academic success in college. At Valdosta State University, all undergraduate and graduate students must meet with their advisor each semester before being allowed to access the registration system and register for classes. While advising is mandatory for all students, the process of advising differs from college to college and department to department.

All first year students will be advised in Centralized Advising. Upon earning 30 semester hours, students will be advised within the department of their declared major.

Students who have not chosen a major are classified as Liberal Arts Students (LAS) and are advised through Centralized Advising; Centralized Advising also advises non-degree seeking students, students in the Associate of Arts program, and students in Learning Support.

Students should check in Banner for the name of their advisor: click here, then log in, click on “Student and Financial Aid,” and then on “Student Information.”

Access Office

The mission of the Access Office is to create an accessible, inclusive, sustainable learning environment, in which disability is recognized as an aspect of diversity that is integral to the campus community and to society. Our primary objective is to provide equal access to campus programs and activities for all students while upholding the academic standards of Valdosta State University. The Access Office is responsible for coordination of accommodations when necessary to remove barriers in the environment. Some examples of services available to eliminate barriers include classroom and testing accommodations, materials in alternate formats, and access to adaptive technology. The Access Office is located in Farbar Hall. For more information, call 229-245-2498 (V), 229-375-5871 (VP), 229-219-1348 (TTY), e-mail access@valdosta.edu, or visit the web site.

Office of Testing

Numerous standardized tests are administered by the Office of Testing to assist students with their testing requirements. The VSU Office of Testing is responsible for administering tests to entering students for the purpose of admission and placement, to undergraduate students for proficiency, to teacher education majors for certification, and to graduate students for admission to specialized programs. Testing programs designed for students to earn college credit hours by examinations are also available. As a designated national test center, the Testing Office administers testing programs for the Educational Testing Service, The Psychological Corporation, the Law School Admissions Council, The American College Testing Program, PearsonVUE, ATI Nursing, the State of Georgia, and the University System of Georgia, as well as for other education, government, and corporate agencies. Prospective registrants should check with the appropriate offices at VSU to determine the required tests needed for admission to a specific discipline and the deadline for test score submission.

Tests available to entering students are the SAT, ACT, and COMPASS Placement Exam. Tests for undergraduates include CLEP, eCore, Independent Study, GACE, PRAXIS, DSST, the TEAS for Nursing majors, and the Major Field Test for Biology majors. Tests required for graduate admissions include the MAT, GMAT, LSAT, and GRE Subject Tests. Credentialing exams are also administered through PearsonVUE and the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA). The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is administered on a national and institutional basis.

The Office of Testing is located in Powell Hall-East, Room 1131. You may contact U.S. by telephone at 229-245-3878 or online.

Student Success Center

The Student Success Center (SSC) at Valdosta State University is the compass that helps students plot a course through their college careers and get a bearing on success through tutoring, advising, and on campus job opportunities. The SSC provides peer tutoring in core curriculum courses, including natural sciences, math, writing, social sciences, and foreign languages, face-to-face and online. In addition, assistance is provided with course and major selection, time management, and long-range academic planning. Through the Student Employment Office, students can find information on securing part-time employment at VSU. All services of the SSC are free to VSU students.

The SSC is located in Langdale Residence Hall and its services are available to all students. Call 229-333-7570 for information or to make an appointment, or visit the web site.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Withdrawal from Courses Policies: For all undergraduate and graduate VSU students

These policies apply to all students (undergraduate and graduate) at Valdosta State University for all classes offered by VSU, whether delivered face-to-face or online. However, some VSU students may be enrolled in classes offered through collaborative partnerships with other institutions or eCore (eMajor, GOML, WebMBA, etc.). In these programs, some policies and processes may differ slightly. Students taking classes in those programs should visit the appropriate program links for further information.

Before the Designated Withdrawal Date

Students may withdraw from courses following the drop/add period until approximately one week after midterm by completing the online withdrawal process on BANNER. A grade of "W" will appear in the student's official records.  For undergraduate students only: Students must meet the requirements of the Limited Withdrawal Policy (see below).

However, a student may not exercise this right to withdraw to avoid sanction for academic dishonesty. Instructors may assign a “W” on the proof roll for students not attending class. It is the responsibility of the student to complete the withdrawal process. A withdrawal is official when it is received and processed by the Office of the Registrar.

After the Designated Withdrawal Date

Students will not be allowed to withdraw after the designated withdrawal date as published in the school calendar as required by Board of Regents’ policy; however, students may petition an exception to the Board of Regents’ withdrawal deadline for cases of hardship by completing a petition for withdrawal form available in the Office of Centralized Advising. The petition will become a permanent part of the student’s file. If the petition is approved, the instructor may assign a grade of “W” or “WF” after mid-term. Note that “WF” is calculated in the grade point average the same as “F.” Any student who discontinues class attendance after midterm and does not officially withdraw may be assigned a grade of “F.” No fee adjustment will be made for withdrawals except as outlined in the Tuition, Fees, and Costs section of this catalog. The Office of Student Financial Services will receive a copy of the withdrawal form for refunding if applicable. Students receiving financial aid or graduate assistantships should be aware that withdrawal from courses may affect continued financial aid eligibility.

To petition for withdrawal after the designated date, students must document either a medical or hardship situation and follow the process below:

Medical Withdrawals from the University

A student who has an injury or illness that prevents the completion of all classes for that term may request a Medical Withdrawal through the Office of Centralized Advising. The Medical Withdrawal process is outlined below. It should be noted that a Medical Withdrawal can be requested only after the designated withdrawal date. A student wanting to withdraw before the designated withdrawal date must follow the Withdrawal from Course Policy outlined in the undergraduate and graduate catalogs.Questions regarding the late withdrawal process should be directed to the Office of Centralized Advising (229-245-4378). It is the student’s responsibility to withdraw officially in accordance with university regulations. Only in very rare instances will a partial withdrawal be considered, such as in cases in which a student may not be able to complete a specific class because of a medical condition or injury that prohibits class participation. For more detailed information on the Medical Withdrawal policy and procedures, click here.

Hardship Withdrawals from the University

A student who has an emergency that prevents the completion of all classes for that term may request a Hardship Withdrawal through the Office of Centralized Advising. The Hardship Withdrawal process is outlined below. It should be noted that a Hardship Withdrawal can be requested only after the designated withdrawal date. A student wanting to withdraw before he designated withdrawal date must follow the Withdrawal from Course Policy outlined in the undergraduate and graduate catalogs. Questions regarding the late withdrawal process should be directed to the Office of Centralized Advising (229-245-4378). It is the student’s responsibility to withdraw officially in accordance with university regulations. Only in very rare instances will a partial withdrawal be considered, such as in cases in which a student may not be able to complete a specific class because of a hardship that prohibits class participation. For more detailed information on the Hardship Withdrawal policy and procedures, click here.

Mental Health Withdrawals

To ensure that its students receive due process rights, Valdosta State University has initiated the following Mental Health Withdrawal Procedure. Before a student may be withdrawn for mental health reasons, there must first be the following chain of events:

1.      The student displays behavioral indicators, which are determined by a mental health professional to be of danger to the student or others.

2.      When a mental health professional recommends that a student needs to be withdrawn from school for mental health reasons, an informal hearing will then be set up to determine whether or not the student should be withdrawn.

3.      In this informal hearing conducted by the Office of the Dean of Students, the student or his or her representative may present any pertinent information that he or she believes will have a bearing on the particular case.

This procedure is enacted to ensure that the student’s legal rights are not violated and that the University has the right to remove any student who it feels, based on professional evaluation, may present a danger to himself or herself or to others.

No fee adjustment will be made for withdrawals except as outlined in the Tuition, Fees, and Costs section of this catalog. The Office of Student Financial Services will receive a copy of the withdrawal form for refunding if applicable.

Limit on Course Withdrawals (5 “W” Policy): For Undergraduate Students Only

Effective Fall 2010, all undergraduate students are limited to five course withdrawal (“W”) grades for their entire enrollment at Valdosta State University. Once a student has accumulated five “W” grades, all subsequent withdrawals (whether initiated by the student in Banner or initiated by the instructor during attendance verification) will be recorded as “WF.” The grade of “WF” is calculated as an “F” for GPA purposes.

The limit on withdrawals does not apply if a student withdraws from all classes in a given semester before the designated withdrawal date of the semester. The following types of withdrawals do not count against the limit of five course withdrawal (“W”) grades:

·         Hardship withdrawals (see policy below)

·         Medical or mental health withdrawals (see policy below)

·         Military withdrawals

·         Grades of “WF”

·         Withdrawals taken in semesters before Fall Semester 2010

·         Withdrawals taken at other institutions

Transfer students, regardless of their classification upon enrolling at Valdosta State University, are also limited to five withdrawals at Valdosta State University.

Change in Major Program

Changes in major programs are made on the basis of careful consideration and planning with the advisor well before the registration period. Any change from one major program to another, especially if made late in the student’s college career, may necessitate additional courses that were not required in the major program originally selected. Additional semesters in residence may also be necessary. Both the accepting and releasing departments must approve a change of major program. Students who change their major or interrupt their college work for more than a year become subject to the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of the change or re-enrollment, as they fulfill degree requirements. Approved Change-of-Major forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

Course or Prerequisite Substitutions and Waivers

Requests for course substitutions or course waivers must contain specific justification for the request and must be approved by the student’s advisor, the head of the department and the dean of the school of the student’s major, and the Registrar. If the substitution or waiver involves a Core Curriculum course, approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs is also necessary. A “Request for Course Substitution/Waiver” form, available in the major’s department, must be completed before approval is official.

Requests for a prerequisite substitution or waiver must be approved by the instructor of the course requiring the prerequisite and by the administrator of that department or school. The department head and course instructor will be notified of all administratively approved prerequisite substitutions or waivers.

Absence Regulations

The University expects that all students shall attend all regularly scheduled class meetings held for instruction or examination. Although independent study is encouraged at Valdosta State University, regular attendance at class is expected. Instructors are required to maintain records of class attendance. The unexcused absence or “cut” is not regarded as a student privilege.

It is recognized that class attendance is essentially a matter between students and their instructors. Instructors must explain their absence policy in the course syllabus. All students are held responsible for knowing the specific attendance requirements as prescribed by their instructors and for the satisfactory make-up of work missed by absences. When students are compelled for any reason to be absent from class, they should immediately contact the instructor.

A student who misses more than 20% of the scheduled classes of a course will be subject to receiving a failing grade in the course.

Absence problems which cannot be resolved between the instructor and student should be referred immediately to the department head responsible for the course. Discontinuance of class attendance without officially withdrawing from a course is sufficient cause for receiving a failing grade in the course. It is assumed that students will consult with their instructor in a given course before initiating procedures for withdrawing from that course. Students officially withdrawing from a course prior to the designated withdrawal date will receive a “W” for the course. After that point, in cases of hardship, students may complete a Petition for Withdrawal form, which is available in Centralized Advising. If the petition is approved, it is the instructor who determines whether the grade awarded is “W” (withdrew passing) or “WF” (withdrew failing). The grade of “WF” is equivalent to an “F” and is calculated in the grade point average as “F.”

Off-campus activities, appropriately supervised and sponsored by faculty members, which appear to justify a student’s absence from scheduled classes, must be approved by the academic dean or director responsible for the activity. Such activities must be justifiable on grounds consistent with the educational program of the University as interpreted by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Instructors determine if a student is excused from class to participate in sanctioned activities, either off-campus or on-campus.

Auditing Classes

Students may be permitted to enroll as auditors in selected courses, provided regular enrollment in the course permits and if such an arrangement is completely agreeable to the instructor concerned. Fees for auditing classes are the same as for credit courses. Students are not permitted to change from audit to credit or from credit to audit after the last day for course changes as specified in the official calendar.

Mid-Term Grades

In-progress grades are reported at the mid-term date of Fall and Spring terms for students in lower division (1000- and 2000-level) courses. Students who want to review their grades on the Student Information System should log in to the VSU Homepage and select “Banner (Registration).” Select “Login” on the Banner Homepage and enter your Web ID and PIN. Then select “Login” again. Select “Student and Financial Aid,” then “Student Records,” and finally “Academic Transcript.” Those experiencing difficulties in their academic work should contact the instructor, advisor, or advising center for guidance on available options to improve their academic standing. First-year students are also encouraged to contact their assigned Academic Advisor, located in the Centralized Advising Center (229-245-4378).

Final Examinations

Final examinations are regularly administered for all classes at the end of each term according to an established schedule. The University Calendar is definite as to dates for final examinations, and permission for departure from the schedule cannot be granted. 

Grading System

The semester hour is the basic unit of work, in which each course offered has credit value in terms of a certain number of semester hours normally conforming to the number of contact class hours per week. For example, courses meeting three hours a week normally carry three semester hours of credit. A typical exception occurs in laboratory work, in which two or three hours of class contact have a one-credit-hour value.

Grades and quality points represent the instructor’s final estimate of the student’s performance in a course. All grades assigned remain on the student’s permanent record and transcript. The following letters denote grades which are included in the computation of the grade point average:

A = Excellent 4 per hour
B = Good 3 per hour
C = Satisfactory 2 per hour
D = Passing 1 per hour
WF = Withdrew failing 0
F = Failing 0

The following letters denote cases in which the grade is not included in the computation of the grade point average:

I = Incomplete

IP = In progress (course scheduled for more than one semester)

K = Credit by examination 

S = Satisfactory

U = Unsatisfactory

V = Audit

W = Withdrew, without penalty

NR = Not reported by instructor or course ending date is after the scheduled end of the semester

A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 (i.e., an average of at least “C” in all work attempted) is required for graduation from VSU. Grades for credit accepted in transfer or by examination are posted on a student’s permanent record card but are not included in the calculation of the VSU cumulative grade point average.

The cumulative grade point average will be calculated by dividing the number of hours scheduled in all courses attempted in which a grade of A, B, C, D, F, or WF has been assigned into the number of quality points earned on those hours scheduled.

Computation of the cumulative grade point average treats WF and F grades identically. Grades of W, NR, S, V, U, K, IP, and I are not computed.

Courses passed with a grade of D cannot be counted as satisfying the requirements in the major area or in a minor.

The repeat rule was discontinued Summer 1989. Cumulative grade point averages calculated prior to that time continue to include the repeat provisions. Academic records that were not adjusted for courses repeated prior to Summer 1989 will not be altered.

A report of I (incomplete) indicates that a student was doing satisfactory work at the end of the term but, for non-academic reasons, was unable to complete all requirements for the course. A report of I requires the subsequent completion of all course requirements within a time limit specified by the instructor, not to exceed one calendar year from the end of the term in which a grade of incomplete is assigned, regardless of the student’s enrollment status during the period specified for completion. Students are responsible for making arrangements with their instructor for completion of course requirements within the time specified, in accordance with this regulation. If an I is not changed to a letter grade within one calendar year, it will be changed to the grade F.

NR is assigned when an instructor fails to submit final grades by the established deadline or when the course ending date is after the schedule end of the semester. The Incomplete or NR grade will remain on the student’s permanent record and transcript. An Incomplete will be changed to an F or WF if not removed by the required period of time indicated above.

Grade Changes

Final grades submitted by the course instructor may not be changed except for approved special circumstances. A request for grade change form must be submitted by the instructor, and the change-of-grade form must be approved by the appropriate officials and forwarded to the Registrar.

Grade Appeals

Students have the right to appeal their grades; however, they should do so within 30 days of the grade’s posting on Banner. To appeal a grade, a student should complete the grade appeal form (available online at the Registrar's Office) with all pertinent information and then speak with the professor about the change. If the professor and the student do not resolve the situation, the student may then proceed to appeal to the department head and, finally, the dean.

Academic Renewal Policy

The Academic Renewal Policy allows Valdosta State University degree-seeking undergraduate students who have experienced academic difficulty to have one opportunity to make a fresh start at Valdosta State University after an absence of three consecutive calendar years from any postsecondary institution. Students may attend other institutions during the Period of Absence; however, that coursework will not be eligible for Academic Renewal. Transfer credit for any coursework taken during the Period of Absence shall be granted in accordance with the prevailing USG and institutional policies and procedures regarding the awarding of transfer credit. If a student does not request Academic Renewal status at the time of re-enrollment, the student may do so within two academic semesters of re-enrollment or one calendar year, whichever comes first.

Former Developmental Studies students may apply for Academic Renewal only if they successfully completed all Developmental Studies requirements before the commencement of the 5-year period of absence.

All previously attempted coursework continues to be recorded on the student’s official transcript. A complete statement of the policy and the form, Application for Academic Renewal, are available in the Office of the Registrar.

Academic Probation and Suspension

Valdosta State University seeks to provide an environment suitable for promoting the systematic pursuit of learning. To ensure this primary goal, the University requires of its students reasonable academic progress. The retention of those students who repeatedly demonstrate a lack of ability, industry, maturity, and preparation would be inconsistent with this requirement.

Academic probation serves as the initial notice that the student’s performance is not currently meeting the minimum grade point average required for graduation. Continued performance at this level will result in the student’s being placed on academic suspension. Academic probation is designed to serve three purposes: (1) to make clear to all concerned the inadequacy of a student’s performance; (2) to provide occasion for necessary counseling; and (3) to give students whose success is in doubt additional opportunity to demonstrate performance.

Academic suspension is imposed as a strong indication that the student incurring such suspension should withdraw from the University, at least for a time, to reconsider the appropriateness of a college career or to make necessary fundamental adjustments in attitudes toward the academic demands of college.

  1. Stages of Progress with Minimum Grade Point Averages Required
    An individual’s stage of progress is determined on the basis of the number of academic semester hours attempted, including those transferred from other institutions. Transfer credits are not included in computing grade point averages.
    Semester hours attempted at VSU and hours transferred to VSU Cumulative grade-point average required on VSU courses
    1 - 29 1.60
    30 - 59 1.75
    60 - 89 1.90
    90 - graduation 2.00
  2.  Academic Probation
    A student will be placed on academic probation if, at the end of any semester while the student is in good standing, the cumulative GPA falls below the minimum specified in the table above or the semester GPA falls below 2.00. Even though a student on probation is making some progress toward graduation, it should be clearly understood that without immediate academic improvement, suspension may result.
  3. Academic Suspension and Academic Dismissal
    1. A student will be suspended if at the end of any term, while on academic probation, the cumulative GPA falls below the minimum specified in the table above, and the term GPA falls below 2.00.
    2. A first suspension will be for one semester. (See readmission procedures below.)
    3. A second suspension shall be for two academic semesters.
    4. A third or subsequent suspension shall result in the student’s being academically dismissed from the institution for a minimum period of three years.
    5. A student while on suspension shall not be granted transient permission to attend another institution unless prior approval is obtained from the student’s Dean at Valdosta State University.
    6. Only fall and spring semesters count as “sit out” semesters. (See 3 b, c, above.)
  4. Right of Appeal
    Upon appeal by the student, the dean or director of the respective academic unit in which the student is enrolled has the authority to waive the first or second suspension if unusual circumstances warrant. The third suspension can be appealed only by petition to the Admissions Advisory Committee.
  5. Readmission Procedures
    Students must make application for readmission in writing to the Director of Admissions prior to registration for the semester in which they plan to return. Following the first or second suspension, readmission on probation may be granted for unusual and compelling reasons by the dean or director of the college or division in which the student was enrolled at the time of suspension. A suspended student readmitted on probation may have specific academic requirements imposed by the Admissions Advisory Committee or by the Vice President for Enrollment Management. A petition to the Committee and personal appearance before the Committee are required. Any further appeals must be made by petition directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. A student accepted for readmission, suspended at the end of the last term of attendance, who does not re-enroll will remain on academic suspension.

Work by Correspondence and Extension

Not more than 30 semester hours of undergraduate work may be earned by extension and credit by examination, of which not more than 17 semester hours may be by correspondence. Under no circumstances will students in the final year of residence (30 semester hours) be permitted to take more than seven (7) semester hours by correspondence or extension. Students in residence may not enroll for correspondence or extension work except by permission of the appropriate dean or director. No course which a student may have failed while in residence at Valdosta State University may be taken by correspondence or extension for degree credit. The Student Affairs Office coordinates correspondence study. Credit from University of Georgia Extension Centers will be restricted to lower division (1000 and 2000 level) in addition to the 30-hour limitation.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic integrity is the responsibility of all VSU faculty and students. Faculty members should promote academic integrity by including clear instruction on the components of academic integrity and clearly defining the penalties for cheating and plagiarism in their course syllabi. Students are responsible for knowing and abiding by the Academic Integrity Policy as set forth in the Student Code of Conduct and the faculty members’ syllabi. All students are expected to do their own work and to uphold a high standard of academic ethics. Appendix A of the Student Code of Conduct in the VSU Student Handbook outlines academic integrity violations as well as the academic response and disciplinary response to such violations. The online VSU Student Handbook reflects the most current policy on academic integrity. Academic integrity violations may result in suspension or expulsion from the university. Additional information on academic integrity as well as resources for faculty and students can be found at the Academic Affairs web site.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as “the copying of the language, structure, programming, computer code, ideas, and/or thoughts of another and passing off same as one’s own, original work” (Virginia Tech Honor Code Constitution). The violation, then, consists of both copying and misrepresenting the material in question. When a student places his or her name on any kind of work, he or she claims responsibility for the originality of the contents except for those parts that are specifically attributed to another or that are considered common knowledge. If a student has consulted any outside source, whether published or not, and has incorporated any of its “language, structure, ideas, programming, computer code, and/or thoughts” into his or her work without acknowledging that source, he or she may be guilty of misrepresenting the work’s originality. When paraphrasing material from an outside source, the student must change both the sentence structure and the vocabulary (where possible) in expressing the original material in his or her own words. Any instance where the “language, structure, ideas, programming, computer code, and/or thoughts” have been borrowed from another’s work, paraphrased or not, without proper reference/citation, the act constitutes plagiarism on the part of the writer.

Course sections may use plagiarism-prevention technology. Students may have the option of submitting their written work online through a plagiarism-prevention service or of allowing the instructor to submit their work. The written work may be retained by the service for the sole purpose of checking for plagiarized content in future student submissions.

Advising and Registration

If you are just starting at VSU and need help, go to the office with the title that matches your needs: Office of Admissions (located at 1413 North Patterson Street), Office of the Registrar (in University Center), Department Head (of your major interest), Dean of the College (in which your major department is located), or Vice President for Academic Affairs (107 West Hall). If you are undecided about your major, contact the Centralized Advising Center (1114 University Center).

If you have decided upon a major or general area of study, contact the Department Head of the appropriate discipline or the Dean of the College in which the department is located. The campus directory contains a list of departments, schools, colleges, and administrators, with office locations and telephone numbers. Department Heads and Deans are the appropriate individuals to contact for any academic problem at any time. All academic units report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, 107 West Hall.

The Academic Year

All curricula and courses at Valdosta State University are offered within the framework of the semester system. Fall and spring semesters make up the traditional academic year, though students may pursue degree requirements on a year-round basis in courses that consist of parts-of-terms (weekends or shorter formats). Traditional fall and spring semesters run for approximately 16 weeks each, including the examination period. The summer semester is often reduced in length, with the length of class periods appropriately adjusted.

Preparation for Professional Schools

Preparation for Law School

Although law schools require a baccalaureate degree for admission, they do not always specify a particular undergraduate major or prescribe a specific pre-law program. Literate, well-informed students with a broad general education tend to succeed in law school. Students aspiring to enter law school may major and minor in any of a number of fields which will aid them in attaining the following: (1) fluency in written and spoken English; (2) the ability to read difficult material with rapidity and comprehension; (3) a solid background of American history and government; (4) a broad education in social and cultural areas; (5) a fundamental understanding of business, including basic accounting procedures; and (6) the ability to reason logically.

Preparation for Medical, Dental, Veterinary Medicine, and other Professional and Graduate Schools Offering Doctoral Degrees in Health Sciences

Students should be aware that the vast majority of applicants now admitted to schools and programs in these categories hold the baccalaureate degree and will have established well above normal scores and averages in overall academic performance as well as on qualifying admission exams. Although students who apply for admission to professional schools may major in any area of study, most choose to major in biology, chemistry, or other natural sciences. Admission requirements may vary slightly from school to school, but all such programs require the basic undergraduate courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Students majoring in other areas should consult the academic advisor, who may in turn wish to refer the student to the Biology or Chemistry Department for more specific information. Examples of paramedical professional degrees include podiatry, chiropractic, osteopathic medicine, and optometry. If an undergraduate degree is not required for entry into one of these fields, it is the responsibility of the student to provide the Academic Advisor with the requirements specified for admission to the school of the student’s choice.

Preparation for Seminaries and Theological Schools

The bachelor’s degree is usually required for admission to accredited theological schools and many seminaries. Students aspiring to enter such institutions should follow in their undergraduate work the general recommendations of the American Association of Theological Schools. Such a program provides students an opportunity to become acquainted with broad areas of subject matter. Advice on such programs is available from the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Valdosta State University — Georgia Institute of Technology Dual Degree Program

Valdosta State University cooperates with the Georgia Institute of Technology in a dual degree program, wherein a student attends Valdosta State for approximately three years and Georgia Institute of Technology for approximately two years. Upon completion of certain academic requirements at each institution, the student is awarded a bachelor’s degree from Valdosta State University and one of more than thirty designated degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology in areas such as engineering, management, and sciences. In the case of highly qualified students, the Georgia Institute of Technology degree may be at the master’s level. For more information, contact the Coordinator for Pre-Engineering.

Second Baccalaureate Degree

A student may work for a second baccalaureate degree, and credits applied toward the first degree will be permitted to meet the second degree requirements, where applicable and appropriate. Students must meet all requirements for the second degree in effect when work on the second degree is begun.

Minors

Minors require 15 to 18 semester hours of course work, with at least 9 hours from courses numbered 3000 or above. Courses taken to satisfy Core Areas A through E may not be counted as coursework in the minor. Courses taken in Core Area F may be counted as coursework in the minor, if departmental policies allow. Minors are offered by various departments and interdisciplinary areas throughout the university. See descriptions of minors in the departmental sections of the catalog. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each course comprising the minor, and all prerequisites for specific upper division courses must be met.

The completed minor will be recorded on the student’s transcript, but not on the diploma. For students completing a minor before graduation, the minor will appear on the transcript at the time of graduation. For students completing a minor after graduation, the minor will be listed on the transcript with a comment indicating when the minor was completed. A student must be enrolled at the time a minor is approved by the Board of Regents, or subsequent to that date, to receive credit for the minor. A student may have more than one minor.

Classification

Promotion from class to class (from freshman through senior) is based on hours earned in academic subjects. The semester hours required for different classifications are:

Class Semester Hours
Freshman 0-29
Sophomore 30-59
Junior 60-89
Senior 90 or more

Academic Load

Twelve or more semester hours constitute full-time enrollment for undergraduates. The typical academic load for undergraduate students is approximately 15 hours per semester. An academic load of 19 hours is permitted without special approval. An academic load greater than 19 hours requires completion of the VSU Petition to Register for More Than Nineteen Hours, showing approvals of the academic advisor, the department head of the student’s major, and the appropriate dean or director. The maximum load for which approval may be given is 21 semester hours credit.

Institutional credit is a unit of credit included in a student’s total hours of academic load, which is the basis for fee calculations. Institutional credit does not apply toward the total number of hours required for graduation nor is it transferable to another institution.

Course Numbering

0000-0999 Remedial Courses. Such courses do not carry credit toward graduation.

1000-2999 Lower Division Undergraduate Courses. Courses with these numbers are basic undergraduate courses.

3000-4999 Upper Division Undergraduate Courses. Courses with these numbers are advanced undergraduate courses. Some schools or divisions may require junior class standing as a prerequisite for these courses.

5000-6999 Mixed Graduate/Upper Division Courses. Some courses numbered 3000-3999 are open to graduate students; such courses carry dual numbers, with the graduate version of the course numbered between 5000 and 5999.

Similarly, courses numbered 4000-4999 may be taken by graduate students using a corresponding number in the range 6000-6999.

7000-9999 Graduate Courses. Enrollment in these courses is restricted to graduate students.

Certain courses require prerequisites (other courses that must be taken before a given course), and/or corequisites (other courses that must be taken during the same term as a given course), or the consent of the instructor or of the Department Head. Students must be sure they have met these requirements, as listed in the course descriptions of this catalog.

Determination of Credit Hours

Valdosta State University utilizes the federal definition of the credit hour as a basis for determining the amount of credit assigned for student work, complying with Federal Regulation Program Integrity Rules, University System of Georgia (USG) Policy 3.4, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges Federal Requirement 4.9 and Policy Statement on Credit Hours. The Academic Committee of the VSU Faculty Senate is responsible for ensuring that credit hours awarded for course work are appropriate, and the VSU Registrar’s Office ensures that credit hours are accurately attached to courses in the student information system. The Registrar’s Office ensures that the number of class minutes for lecture- and laboratory-based courses have been accounted for in the scheduling of courses. The full policy statement is available upon request from the Office of Academic Affairs or the Office of the Registrar.

Cross-Disciplinary Courses

Certain courses, because of their scope and focus, are identified by different designations, that is, cross-listed. Students may decide which designation they wish to register for, depending on their needs, but such a dual-listed or cross-listed course can count only once and cannot be taken a second time for credit under a different designation. Cross-disciplinary courses are clearly identified in the descriptions of the “Courses of Instruction” section as “Also offered as ....”

Registration

Currently enrolled students may register for courses during the following registration periods:

  • Early Registration held approximately six weeks before the term begins. Registration priority is based on student classification in the following order: Graduate students and seniors; juniors; sophomores; freshmen.
  • Regular Registration and drop/add, held immediately prior to the beginning of classes. Registration is held on a first-come, first-served basis. 
  • Late Registration and continued drop/add, held for approximately three or four days after the term begins. A late fee is assessed for registration during the Late Period.

New students are expected to register for classes during orientation programs held prior to the first day of classes.

All undergraduate and graduate students must be advised before registration. Students who have not been advised will not be able to access the registration system.

Registration in all courses offered by the University is under the direct supervision of the Registrar. Published schedules, policies, and procedures for registration must be strictly observed. Registrations are canceled for students who do not pay fees by the published deadlines.

For more information on fee payment procedures, see the section on Tuition, Fees, and Costs.

Graduation Requirements for Undergraduates

Candidates for degrees must complete a minimum of 120 (somewhat more in selected majors) semester hours of academic work, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better calculated from all work attempted at Valdosta State University. Transfer credit applied to degree requirements may be used to satisfy hours but is not included in the VSU cumulative GPA requirements for graduation. No person will be graduated with less than a 2.00 cumulative GPA. The academic work must include a minimum of 39 hours of upper division courses (that is, courses numbered 3000 or above), including at least 21 semester hours of upper division in the major field. Students must earn a “C” or better in ENGL 1101/ENGL 1101H and ENGL 1102/ENGL 1102H. A grade of “C” or better is also required in major area courses and in the courses for the minor. Programs may specify other courses in which a grade of “C” or better is required.

Of the 40 semester hours immediately preceding graduation, at least 30 must be taken in residence at Valdosta State University. Any student admitted to the University for the final year must be in residence for two semesters and must complete in this time at least 30 semester hours in residence, including 21 hours of senior college work in the major.

Students who change their major or interrupt their college work for more than a year become subject to the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of the change or re-enrollment to fulfill degree requirements. Approved Change of Major forms must be submitted to the Registrar. The academic department and college of your major may require an undergraduate course to be repeated for credit, if the course is evaluated to be out of date.

Prospective graduating seniors must apply to the Office of the Registrar for final evaluation of credits and programs two full semesters in advance of the expected graduation date. A $25 graduation fee must be paid at the Bursary prior to final evaluation. This fee is valid for one year beyond the initial term selected for completing degree requirements.

All financial obligations to the University must be cleared before an official diploma will be issued.

General Education

All programs that students may pursue at Valdosta State University are required to demonstrate, directly and indirectly, a basic concern for values associated with higher general education. All students are expected to share this concern throughout the University for enhancing and increasing the individual’s level of personal civilization and refinement as a human being.

English Language Proficiency

All graduates of Valdosta State University are expected to exhibit reasonable maturity and accuracy in speaking and writing the English language and a degree of skill in reading and interpretation commensurate with that of any representative graduate of a creditable American college. Evidence of serious incompetence in these skills may delay or prevent graduation from the University regardless of a student’s major program or special interests.

Credit by Departmental Examination

Students currently enrolled who present satisfactory evidence that they are qualified in a particular subject may receive credit by an examination developed and administered by the appropriate instructional department. Satisfactory evidence may be, but is not limited to, work experience, non-credit courses, course work taken at non-accredited institutions, or military courses. Permission must be obtained from the head of the instructional department offering the course; however, exams will not be permitted in courses for which a student has previously taken an examination for credit or was previously enrolled at Valdosta State University as a regular or audit student. It is suggested that students check with their advisor and the Registrar’s Office prior to requesting an examination for credit, to ensure that the credit will apply toward their graduation requirements. The credit will be entered in the student’s academic record; however, the grade received will not calculate in the semester or cumulative grade point average.

Students must pay the Bursary, in advance of the examination, the current non-refundable fee for credit by examination. The student will show the receipt to the faculty member conducting the examination. The instructional department is responsible for reporting the course number, title, credit hours, and fee receipt to the Registrar’s Office for processing. Failing grades will be reported and posted to the student’s record.

Semester hours can be earned through any combination of CLEP, credit by departmental examination, correspondence courses, extension work, and advanced placement.

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) is a process through which students identify areas of relevant learning from their past experiences, demonstrate that learning through appropriate documentation, and submit their materials so that they can be assessed and possibly awarded academic credit at Valdosta State University. The University will work with students from diverse backgrounds to evaluate their prior learning and determine if it meets the standards and requirements of college-level learning. Semester hours can be earned through any combination of CLEP, credit by departmental examination, correspondence courses, extension work, PLA, International Baccalaureate, and advanced placement. For more information about PLA at VSU, consult the PLA web site.

Exemption Tests

Tests that exempt a student from taking certain courses are conducted by some departments for placement purposes. Credit hours are not awarded for successful completion of placement tests, and there is no fee required to take such a test.

Guidelines for Granting Academic Credit for Participation in Internship Programs

Students who take part in an internship program under any of the various internship courses offered at Valdosta State University derive benefits of a diverse nature from their participation. Some of the benefits inherent in an internship are of an academic nature, and even the non-academic benefits of practical experience may well justify participation in an internship program.

By awarding academic credit for enrollment in an internship program, VSU formally recognizes the academic benefits of the program. The University grants semester hours of academic credit to students involved in internships, the number of hours depending upon the specific departmental internship course in which the student enrolls.

The guidelines that follow have the purpose of allowing maximum flexibility within any given internship program and, at the same time, of requiring the careful thought and work by the participants that will make their internship experience academically significant.

  1. Acceptable Programs. In order to receive academic credit for an internship program, students must be enrolled in an established internship course offered by an academic department of Valdosta State University.
  2. Supervision. All interns will be assigned a faculty supervisor from the academic department in whose internship course they enroll. Supervisors will accept direct responsibility for each intern under their supervision. Faculty supervisors will carefully work out in advance all individual internship programs according to these general guidelines and college or departmental guidelines and shall specify academic requirements. The actual work experience supervision will be by the project directors of the various internship programs.
  3. Academic Credit
    1. Each department that desires to offer internship opportunities will establish an internship course, with the approval of departmental faculty, appropriate executive committee(s), and the Academic Committee, carrying credit of 3, 6, or 9 semester hours or variable credit up to 12 hours in increments of three hours.
    2. Internship courses not required as part of the major will be counted as elective credit.
    3. The number of credit hours to be granted for a particular internship experience will be determined in advance with the intern in keeping with the guidelines pertaining to credit hours as set forth below.
    4. Academic credit will be granted on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
  4. Guidelines for Granting Academic Credit
    1. For academic credit of three semester hours, the internship will involve, at the minimum:
      1. Work in an area directly or indirectly related to the major field of study.
      2. Ten (10) hours of service each week.
      3. A daily log of activities.
      4. A report on the internship experience, relating it to the major field of study. The report will be made after completion of the internship.
    2. For academic credit of six semester hours, the internship program will involve, at the minimum:
      1. Work in an area directly or indirectly related to the major field of study.
      2. Twenty (20) hours of service each week.
      3.  A daily log of activities.
      4. A report on the internship experience, relating it to the major field of study. The report will be made after completion of the internship.
      5. A research paper in an area appropriate to the major and bearing on some aspect of the internship program.
    3. For academic credit of nine semester hours or more, the internship program will involve, at the minimum:
      1. Work in an area directly related to the major field of study. The program should provide an opportunity for direct application of the knowledge gained in the classroom in the major field of study.
      2. A daily log of activities.
      3. Thirty (30) hours of service each week.
      4. A report on the internship experience, relating it to the major field of study. The report will be made after completion of the program.
      5. A research paper or assessment in an area appropriate to the major and bearing on some aspect of the internship program.
      6. Academic credit of 12 semester hours will be granted for 40 hours of approved service per week.

University System Regents' Testing Program

Each institution of the University System of Georgia must assure the other institutions, and the System as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution possess literacy competence, that is, certain minimum skills of reading and writing.

Therefore, students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs shall pass the Regents’ Test as a requirement for graduation. For undergraduate students at Valdosta State University, the Regents’ Test requirement will be fulfilled by a passing grade in ENGL 11021 or an approved substitute.

1

Students failing ENGL 1102 will be required to register for the class each subsequent semester in which they are enrolled at VSU..

Foreign Language Requirements

  1. Students are advised to take the Web Cape Placement Test to determine their placement in the appropriate course level for foreign language study.  It is the expectation that students who are opting to continue with the foreign language they took in high school will begin at the FL 1002 level. If students choose not to take the placement test, they should begin with FL 1002.  Taking the test may allow students to enroll in a more advanced course. The Web Cape Placement Test will guide students and their advisors in this placement. Please refer to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). 

    Prior to your registration date, you may take the Web Cape Placement Test by logging into the web site and using the password blazers1.
    Please print your results and bring the paper with you to your advising appointment.

  2. Requirements for Major Programs
    Throughout the various colleges of the University, majors in selected academic disciplines have established requirements in foreign language and culture to be completed as a part of their program of study. The following list indicates specific requirements, according to degrees and majors. The full listing of degree requirements should be consulted for each major.

Twelve-hour foreign language requirement

B.A. with a major in biology

Nine-hour foreign language requirement:

B.A. with a major in history, mathematics, French, Spanish, philosophy and religious studies, political science, legal assistant studies, sociology and anthropology, criminal justice, psychology, or art.

B.S. with a major in chemistry

Six-hour foreign language requirement:

B.A. with a major in music

B.S. with a major in applied mathematics, astronomy, environmental geosciences, or physics

Foreign language requirement through MCL 2002:

B.A. with a major in English

State of Georgia Legislative Requirements

In accordance with an act of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, all candidates for degree are required to possess and demonstrate a reasonable mastery of United States history, Georgia history, the United States Constitution, and the Georgia Constitution. These history requirements are met by the successful completion of HIST 2111 (3 hours) or HIST 2112 (3 hours). The constitution requirements are met by the successful completion of POLS 1101 (3 hours). Transfer credit for these three courses may not satisfy the requirements of the State of Georgia. Exemption tests in Georgia History or Georgia Constitution are offered to transfer students whose American History or Political Science course(s) did not include Georgia History or Georgia Constitution and to students who have obtained credit in American Government or in American History via the CLEP program, which does not include credit for satisfying the legislative requirements. See the VSU Testing Office in Powell Hall-West concerning the exemption tests in Georgia History and in Georgia Constitution.

Health and Physical Education

There is no University-wide physical education requirement. However, certain degree programs, particularly teacher certification programs in education, may include KSPE 2000 Health and Wellness for Life within the degree requirements. Review the degree requirements for your particular degree program.

All students are encouraged to include at least one development and one recreational physical education course in their programs.

Junior and Senior College Work

Required lower division courses are introductory in nature and are designed as prerequisites to upper division work. These include courses required by the University System Core Curriculum and are to be taken normally before a student achieves junior classification.

Recognition of Undergraduate Superior Achievement

Graduation with Honors

Three levels of graduation honors recognize exceptional students qualifying for the bachelor’s degree. These honors are based upon all academic work attempted, including all courses attempted at other institutions. A minimum of 60 semester hours of academic work, including any student teaching, must be successfully completed in residence at Valdosta State University. Credit by examination or exemption will not be included in the work considered for residence.

Cum Laude for an overall grade point average of 3.50 and a VSU cumulative average of 3.50.

Magna Cum Laude for an overall grade point average of 3.70 and a VSU cumulative average of 3.70.

Summa Cum Laude for an overall grade point average of 3.90 and a VSU cumulative average of 3.90.

Honors shown in the graduation program reflect grades on student transcripts entered through the term immediately preceding graduation. For students who participate in a graduation ceremony before they have completed all degree requirements, honors recognitions will appear in the program of the next scheduled ceremony after they have completed all graduation requirements. Official honors included on diplomas include all work attempted at VSU and all other institutions, including accepted and non-accepted credit.

Dean’s List

Students achieving a semester GPA of 3.50 or higher on nine (9) or more semester hours with an institutional (VSU) GPA of 3.00 or higher are recognized by being placed on the Dean’s List. Neither incomplete grades (I) nor the final grades and hours when the incomplete is removed are included in the Dean’s List calculation. (Developmental Studies, transients, and graduate students are not eligible for Dean’s List status.)

University Honors College

The Honors College offers interdisciplinary seminars, a special track of core curriculum courses, and opportunities for independent research that lead to a Certificate in University Honors. The program is designed to provide for the stimulation and challenge of academically motivated students so that they achieve their full academic potential, while at the same time providing recognition for such students’ endeavors. The Honors College encourages connections between disciplines, interdisciplinary programs, innovative and unusual approaches to subject matter, and a reliance upon experiential learning that is fully integrated into the course content. The courses and seminars are designed to give all students in the Honors College a shared intellectual experience in order to develop a community of learners and to encourage a spirit of collegiality in the pursuit of knowledge, a spirit that is essential for intellectual growth and personal fulfillment. Offerings include:

  1. Limited-enrollment classes in anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, economics, health, history, literature and languages, mathematics, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology. All of these courses satisfy core curriculum requirements, depending on the student’s major.
  2. Special honor seminars with an interdisciplinary focus. These explore a wide range of interesting, controversial, and timely issues. These seminars can satisfy elective credit in a variety of major degree programs.
  3. Honors Fora, a series of discussions and lectures led by faculty, visiting scholars, and distinguished members of the community.

The University Honors College also sponsors the Honors Student Association, open to all students with a grade point average of 3.0. The Honors College is affiliated with the National Collegiate Honors Council, the Southern Regional Honors Council, and the Georgia Honors Council. These affiliations afford wide opportunity for travel to academic conventions and conferences. Click here for application forms and further information.

Student Records

The Office of the Registrar maintains the academic records of students and issues transcripts of records and certificates for various governmental agencies.

Students are encouraged to check with the Registrar’s Office when questions arise concerning academic status. All students have a permanent record to which only they and authorized personnel have access, and it is to the student’s advantage to check this record periodically. Official transcripts are provided upon written request of the student. All undergraduate and graduate work constitutes a complete academic record. Portions of that record will not be deleted when transcripts are provided. All grades assigned remain on the student’s permanent record and transcript. Two weeks’ processing time should be allowed for the preparation of transcripts and certifications.

Transcripts of academic records from other colleges and high schools are not provided. The student must contact previous institutions attended for those transcripts. It is also the student’s responsibility to contact testing agencies for test score reports. Students may request copies of other academic records through the Registrar’s Office.

Transcript Policy

A transcript is an official copy of the official permanent academic record maintained by the Registrar. Recorded on the permanent academic record are all VSU courses attempted, all grades assigned, degrees received, and a summary of transfer hours accepted with VSU equivalent course numbers indicated. Official transcripts and certifications of student academic records are issued by the Office of the Registrar for all students of the University. Copies of high school records and transfer transcripts from other schools must be requested from the institutions where the course work was taken.

Transcripts may be requested in writing or online. (See Transcript Fees, in the section on Tuition, Costs, and Fees.) Normally, transcripts will be mailed within one week of the request unless the request is delayed because of a “hold” on the record or delayed for posting of a grade change, an earned degree, or current semester grades. Requests are processed in the order they are received. Students requiring priority service may pay a special processing fee.

All transcripts must be requested by the individual student, including transient students desiring transfer credit at another institution. No partial or incomplete transcripts including only certain courses or grades are issued. Transcripts will not be released unless the student has satisfied all financial and other obligations.

Valdosta State University will not provide official copies of student records by facsimile transmission.

Transcript policies apply as well to all certification forms and letters.

Diploma Replacement

Valdosta State University will provide replacement diplomas for graduates whose diplomas have been damaged or lost. The cost of this service will be the current diploma replacement fee charged by the University.

Valdosta State University mails diplomas to graduates. The institution will replace lost or damaged diplomas, without cost to the student, when such loss or damage occurs during that mailing. The student must return damaged diplomas or documentation from the United States Post Office that the diploma cannot be located. A period of 2 to 4 weeks is required to process all special replacement orders.

Diplomas will not be reissued when graduates change their name from that officially recorded at the time when degree requirements were met.

Enrolling at Another Institution as a Transient Student

A regularly enrolled undergraduate student wishing to attend another institution for one term, with the intention of returning to Valdosta State University, will be considered a “transient” student at the other school. The following procedure must be followed to obtain “transient” status:

  1. A transient request form must be obtained from the student’s major department or the Registrar’s Office.
  2. The form must be approved by the student’s advisor, who must also approve specific courses to be taken as a transient student.
  3. The form must be submitted to the Admissions Office for evaluation of proposed transient course.
  4. All holds (such as traffic fines, library fines, etc.) must be cleared with the appropriate office before a transient request can be processed.
  5. The completed transient request form must be sumitted to the Registrar’s Office for processing.
  6. Students should contact the school they are planning to attend to inquire about admission requirements.
  7. Students must request an official transcript from the other institution for transfer credit evaluation by the VSU Admissions Office.

Credit will not be accepted and posted to the Valdosta State University record until an official transcript has been received from the other institution, and all transfer credit requirements have been met as specified in the current VSU Catalog. Transfer credit applied to degree requirements may be used to satisfy hours but will not be calculated into the student’s VSU cumulative grade point average requirements for graduation. Credit is not acceptable in transfer for students who are on academic suspension at Valdosta State University without their VSU Dean’s prior approval. Valdosta State University accepts a maximum of 90 total semester hours in transfer. Of the 40 semester hours immediately preceding graduation, at least 30 must be taken in residence at VSU. Any student admitted to the University for the final year must be in residence for two semesters and must complete in this time at least 30 semester hours in residence, including 21 hours of senior college work in the major. Students who have not attended Valdosta State University for over one year must apply for readmission and must satisfy degree requirements as specified in the VSU Catalog current at the time of reapplication.

International Programs and Initiatives

Center for International Programs

The Center for International Programs provides central coordination for the University’s comprehensive range of services and activities in the area of international education. Campus-wide committees, open to all faculty and staff members, work with the Center for International Programs to achieve the following objectives:

  1. Strengthen the international dimension of the curriculum by assuring that international issues, problems, and perspectives are appropriately represented in courses, major degree programs, and minor studies;
  2. Enrich the international dimension of the co-curricular climate by sponsoring internationally oriented lectures, artistic activities, seminars, and thematic events with an international focus;
  3. Provide international experiences for students and faculty by initiating and sponsoring study abroad programs and exchange agreements with foreign colleges and universities and by cooperating with external organizations and agencies that support teaching, study, and research activities in the international dimension for faculty and students;
  4. Encourage the involvement of international students and scholars in the life of the University through the provision of comprehensive support services for international students and faculty and the promotion of Valdosta State as a welcoming environment for foreign scholars and students; and
  5. Heighten global awareness and understanding in the region of South Georgia by bringing together resources of the University and community in educational and civic programs for the general public and maintaining strong linkages with other institutions in the region.

Among its many activities, the Center for International Programs administers an International Studies Minor; coordinates study abroad and exchange opportunities for faculty and students; oversees support services for international students, works with national and international agencies and organizations to enrich the learning, teaching, and research opportunities at VSU; and organizes community engagement events and lecture series on international themes. More information on international activities of the University is available in the Center for International Programs, located at 204 Georgia Avenue, or online.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Valdosta State University offers a variety of study abroad and exchange programs. Summer programs are offered directly by the University, with VSU faculty as program directors and in cooperation with other institutions and organizations in providing group study abroad experiences. Students may also participate in exchange programs that allow them to attend overseas universities as regular students for a semester or an academic year. These bilateral exchange opportunities are currently available in the U.K., Belize, China, the Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Spain, and other countries. VSU is also a member of the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) through which students may choose from over 100 universities worldwide for study abroad experiences. When participating in an exchange, students typically pay VSU tuition, dormitory, and dining hall fees to cover instruction, room, and board at a host institution abroad. To learn more, visit our web page.

Foreign Student Advisor

An international student advisor provides support services to the international student community at Valdosta State University. This advisor, located in the Center for International Programs, 204 Georgia Avenue, assists international students in their VSU inquiries and applications, obtaining visas and maintaining immigration status; provides orientation to new arrivals into the university and community life; assists and advises the VSU Society for International Students; organizes special activities for international and domestic students; and offers cultural counseling. For more information visit our web page

VSU International Initiatives

  1. International Student Services and Exchange Programs
  2. VSU Study Abroad Programs
  3. USG European Council and other Area Studies initiatives
  4. Brown Senior Scholar Awards for International Faculty
  5. International Academic Partnerships
  6. English Language Institute
  7. International Studies Minor Degree
  8. International Advisory Council and Committees
  9. Faculty Internationalization Fund support for VSU faculty
  10. Fulbright Program and other federal agency-sponsored activities