T.B.A., Department Head
Room 1045, Education Building

The Department of Teacher Education is a multidisciplinary department that offers the B.S.Ed. degree with a major in elementary education, middle grades education, deaf education, or American sign language/English interpreting.

The department offers a program of study in middle grades education (grades 4-8) with candidates choosing two concentrations selected from language arts, mathematics, science, reading, or social studies. The programs provide experiences that allow preservice teachers to develop the content knowledge and pedagogical skills necessary for meeting the diverse needs of their future students. Emphasis is placed on student-centered and reflective approaches for communicating effectively, using the tools of inquiry, developing learning opportunities for all students, integrating technology into instruction, and fostering relationships within the larger community. A pre-professional degree is available in deaf and hard-of-hearing (P-12) with a professional degree available with a major in American sign language/interpreting. Candidates are prepared in areas of instruction, service, assessment, and multiple modes of communication.

Freshmen who are interested in initial teacher certification in secondary education (grades 6-12) will first complete a B.A. or B.S. degree in a content teaching field and then enter the Alternative Certification Track Master’s Program (ACT) in the Department of Teacher Education.

 American Sign Language Studies

ASLS 2110. American Sign Language I. 3 Hours.

Pre- or Corequisite: INTP 2998, DEAF 2998, or DEAF 2999. The first in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This course presents introductory components of ASL, including signs, fingerspelling, mime, body language, and facial expression. Information about the history of sign language and its existence in society today is also included. Skill focus is on recognition and recall of American Sign Language.

ASLS 2120. American Sign Language II. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 2110. The second in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This course presents additional components of ASL, including signs, fingerspelling, mime, body language, and facial expression. Skill focus is on recognition and recall of American Sign Language with emphasis on increasing speed and fluency.

ASLS 2130. American Sign Language III. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ASLS 2120; DEAF 2999 or INTP 2998. The third course in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This course is designed to increase recognition and recall skills in dialogue communication. American Sign Language idioms are also included as well as a deeper understanding of the grammar, syntax, and complexities within the language.

ASLS 3140. Linguistics of American Sign Language. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: INTP 2998 and ASLS 2130 or permission of the instructor. An overview of structural linguistics, sociolinguistics, and pragmatics of American Sign Languages (ASL). Linguistic theories will be applied to both spoken English and ASL, with other examples being drawn from various languages. Special attention will be paid to phonological (including the application of phonological rules), morphological, lexical, syntactical, and discourse structures of ASL, as well as language variation and language change.

ASLS 3180. American Sign Language IV. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 2130 and INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. The fourth in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This class is an advanced course in American Sign Language for students who have completed previous coursework in ASL. Emphasis is placed on the production of non-voiced, conversational, spontaneous, signed sentences. Continued attention is given to the development of recognition as well as recall skills. Sociolinguistics with specific reference to syntax and the role of non-manual markers and idioms are explored as well as the interplay between language and culture within the deaf community.

ASLS 3190. Fingerspelling, Numbers, & Classifiers. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ASLS 2120; INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. Concepts and principles of ASL, providing increased emphasis on receptive and expressive skills in discourse and narratives, with particular attention to fingerspelling, numbers, and classifiers.

ASLS 3210. American Sign Language V. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 3180. The fifth in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. Emphasis is placed on the production of non-voiced, conversational, spontaneous signed sentences and dialogues, with specific reference to syntax and the role of non-manual markers and idioms.

ASLS 3220. American Sign Language VI. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 3210. The sixth in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. Emphasis is placed on the production of non-voiced, conversational, spontaneous signed sentences and dialogues.

 Deaf Education

DEAF 2998. Entry to the Profession for Minors. 0 Hours.

Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” A required non-credit course for all candidates pursuing a minor in deaf studies. The course must be completed in conjunction with ASLS 2110, ASLS 2120, or prior to admission to junior level courses.

DEAF 2999. Entry to the Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” A required non-credit course for all deaf education initial certification candidates pursuing a VSU-recommended program of study. The course must be successfully completed prior to or corequisite with the first semester of professional graduate-level courses listed in the program of study. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio, have passed or exempted the Regents’ exam, have a 2.5 GPA or higher, have a satisfactory criminal background check, and purchase liability insurance. If an “Unsatisfactory” grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a “Satisfactory” grade is received.

DEAF 3040. Legal and Ethical Issues for Deaf Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: DEAF 2999. A study of the legal and ethical aspects of special education and services for individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf with additional disabilities. Topics will include an overview of the U.S. legal system; discrimination, constitutional, statutory, and regulatory issues; and case law related to special education, with specific emphasis on deaf education.

DEAF 3100. Orientation to Deaf Education & Language Learning. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. An overview of the field of deaf education, with an emphasis on language development in children and adults who are deaf. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the ear, language modes, assessment instruments, and other topics pertinent to the field. Emphasis is placed on flexibility in using different modes of communication as they relate to stages of language development.

DEAF 3120. Learning, Cognition, and Social Development in Deaf Children. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. An introduction to the study of the growth and development of deaf and hard of hearing children and how being deaf may affect an individual’s educational, cognitive, and social development. The focus of this class is toward a general understanding of how being deaf or hard of hearing is influential in shaping the life experiences of individuals. Various perspectives regarding being deaf will be explored and examined in light of general theories of psychological and social development.

DEAF 3130. Orientation to Deaf Education: Communication, Culture, and Language. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: DEAF 2999 or INTP 2998. An overview of the field of Deaf Education with an emphasis on communication, culture, and language. The focus of this class is a general understanding of how communication, culture, and language influence the life experiences and educational services of Deaf or hard of hearing individuals.

DEAF 3150. Deaf Community, Culture, & History. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites ASLS 2130, ASLS 3180, and INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. Overview of the historical and cultural aspects of the Deaf community and the patterns of social change during the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will be exposed to ASL literature, including folklore, fiction, nonfiction, and drama.

DEAF 4050. Manual Communication. 3 Hours.

An introduction to manual communication. Emphasis is placed on skill development in the use of American Sign Language. Open as an elective to all undergraduate majors.

Early Childhood Education

ECED 2999. Entry to the Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be success- fully completed prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an un- satisfactory grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a satisfactory grade is received.

ECED 3000. Special Topics in Early Childhood Education. 3 Hours.

Study of current issues and concepts in early childhood education. May be repeated under different topics for a total of 6 credit hours with approval of the student's faculty advisor and major department head.

ECED 3400. Planning for Instruction and Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ECSE 2999. Fundamentals of teaching across all content area subject matter will be explored including models of teaching, lesson and unit planning, and creating a classroom environment that is conducive to learning.

ECED 4300. Teaching Language Arts in Early Childhood Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ECSE 2999. The application of methods for teaching listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing in early childhood. Emphasis is placed on methods of process writing for the genres of journal, descriptive, letter, biographical, narrative, and poetic writing.

 Early Childhood and Special Education

ECSE 3220. Professional Roles and Relationships in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisites: ECSE 3210; a field experience, as prescribed by the instructor. Candidates will learn how to develop the Individualized Education Program (IEP) document and prepare for and conduct the IEP meeting; advocate for and communicate effectively with parents; and use collaborative skills and culturally responsive practices to resolve conflicts and build consensus across professional partnerships.

ECSE 3390. Early Childhood Inclusive Practicum and Seminar: Pre-K-K. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, maintenance of required GPA. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” Supervised classroom experiences in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten classrooms. Candidates work under the supervision of mentor teachers and university supervisors for a minimum of 100 hours. Emphasis will be placed on addressing students with and without disabilities in the classroom environment. Candidates will also participate in debriefing seminars focused on the implementation of developmentally appropriate content areas, strands, and teaching formats.

ECSE 3490. Early Childhood Inclusive Practicum and Seminar: Grades 1-3. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, maintenance of required GPA, Grade of “S” in ECSE 3390. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” Supervised classroom experiences in inclusive first- through third-grade classrooms. Candidates work under the supervision of mentor teachers and university supervisors for a minimum of 100 hours. Emphasis will be placed on addressing students with and without disabilities in the classroom environment. Candidates will also participate in debriefing seminars focused on implementation of developmentally appropriate content areas, strands, and teaching formats. Candidates will be observed implementing appropriate teaching and management strategies for all students in their first through third grade classroom experience.

ECSE 4210. Advanced Management of Learning Environments. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; ECSE 3210; ECSE 3220. Review and implementation of fundamentals of creating classroom environments that are conducive to learning. The course will focus on individual and group management strategies that facilitate inclusion of students with disabilities in classrooms. The role of functional behavioral analysis and teachers’ responsibilities in this process will be defined. Teacher candidates will synthesize information enabling them to effectively manage learning environments, collect data, and evaluate their ability to manage student learning and social behaviors in fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms. A field experience, as prescribed by the instructor, is required for this course.

ECSE 4310. Functional Academic and Behavior Assessment. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, ECSE 3010, ECSE 3020. Corequisite: ECSE 4010. Assessments to address the needs of students who are not progressing academically with current methods and who may be demonstrating behavioral challenges in the classroom. A field experience, as prescribed by the instructor, is required for this course.

ECSE 4390. Early Childhood Inclusive Practicum and Seminar: Grades 4-5. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, maintenance of required GPA, grade of “S” in ECSE 3390 and 3490. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” Supervised classroom experiences in inclusive fourth- or fifth-grade classrooms. Candidates work under the supervision of mentor teachers and university supervisors for a minimum of 100 hours. Emphasis will be placed on addressing students with and without disabilities in the general education classroom environment. Candidates will also participate in debriefing seminars focused on implementation of developmentally appropriate content areas, strands, and teaching formats. Candidates will be observed implementing appropriate teaching and management strategies for all students in their fourth- through fifth-grade classroom experience.

ECSE 4490. Student Teaching and Reflective Seminar in Early Childhood and Special Education. 9 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of all core and previous semester professional courses (professional courses with a “C” or higher), and a GPA of 2.75. Corequisite: ECSE 4420. A full-day, semester-long experience in early childhood inclusive P-5 classrooms under the supervision of a mentor teacher and a university supervisor.

Elementary Education

ELED 2999. Entry to Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be successfully complete prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an "unsatisfactory" grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a "Satisfactory" grade is received.

ELED 3190. Elementary Education Practicum and Seminar: PreK-K. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: EDuC 2999 course, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Pre-K or K classroom experiences supervised by mentor teachers and university supervisor; debriefing seminars on the implementation of developmentally appropriate content, appropriate classroom management techniques, appropriate teaching formats and strategies, and professional behavior; and observation of teaching and management strategies.

ELED 3300. Mathematics and Technology in Elementary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 4690, or a practicum approved at the program level. Recent developments in curriculum and methods on instruction of contemporary school mathematics in grades P-5, including the use of manipulative materials, technology, and other resources.

ELED 3690. Elementary Education Practicum and Seminar: Grades 4-5. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: EDUC 2999 course, minimum GPA 2.75, and grade of "C" or better in ELED 3190. Grade 4-5 classroom experiences supervised by mentor teachers and university supervisors; debriefing seminars on the implementation of developmentally appropriate content, appropriate classroom management techniques, appropriate teaching formats and strategies, and professional behavior; and observation of teaching strategies.

ELED 4010. Assessment, Planning, and Differentiated Instruction. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, ELED 3010, ELED 3020, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 4690, or a practicum approved at the program level. Expansion of candidates’ knowledge and skills regarding appropriate evidence-based practices and theories of learning in grades 1-3 that underlie the teaching and learning processes related to assessment, planning, differentiated instruction, and associated curricular disciplines to meet the needs of diverse learners in general education, inclusive classrooms.

ELED 4400. Social Science Methods in Elementary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Corequisite: ELED 4690, or a practicum approved at the program level. A study of the content, curriculum, methods, and technology to support instruction in the social sciences in grades P-5.

ELED 4420. Student Teaching Reflective Seminar. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of all core and previous semester professional courses (professional courses with a “C” or higher) and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Corequisite: ELED 4790. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” Examination of the nature, extent, and significance of involving families in the education of children in grades P-5. Interrelationships of home, school, and community agencies are examined in light of various programs, methods, and techniques of parent education. Leadership skills are emphasized in the areas of training, supporting, and guiding with instructional support team members (i.e., paraprofessionals, academic coaches, etc.) and parent and community volunteers within the context of a developmentally appropriate classroom environment. Components of creating an elementary classroom environment that are conducive to learning will be discussed.

ELED 4500. Science and Technology in Elementary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Corequisite: ELED 3690, or a practicum approved at the program level. Application of developmentally appropriate science programs in the context of standards-based inquiry and focusing on constructivist models of student learning of content, attitudes, and skills. Instructional technology will be integrated with curriculum for grades P-5.

ELED 4690. Elementary Education Practicum and Seminar: Grades 1-3. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: EDUC 2999, minimum GPA of 2.75 and a "C" or better in ELED 3190 and ELED 3690. Grades 1-3 classroom experience supervised by mentor teachers and university supervisors; debriefing seminars focused on the implementation of developmentally appropriate content, appropriate classroom management techniques, appropriate teaching formats and strategies, and professional behavior; and observation of appropriate teaching and management strategies.

ELED 4790. Student Teaching in Elementary Education. 9 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of all core and previous semester professional courses (professional courses with a "C" or higher) and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Corequisite: ELED 4420. Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". A full-day, semester-long experience in elementary K-5 classrooms under the supervision of a mentor teacher and a university supervisor.

ELED 4890. Internship in Elementary Education. 6 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of requirements to student teach as listed in the University’s Undergraduate Catalog, submission of passing scores on GACE Content assessment, and certification by a school district of the status of the candidate as an employee. Credit: Course completion requires a two-semester internship, taken for a total of 12 hours (6 hours each semester). Guided professional experiences in an elementary classroom (P-5) as a capstone/culminating activity of the Elementary Education Program. Candidates teach and manage a classroom under the guidance of a mentor teacher and university supervisor. Experience includes observations, participation, teaching, classroom management, and collaboration with school personnel.

Elementary Education Special Education

ELES 3010. Planning, Instruction, and Developmentally Appropriate Practices. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3190, or a practicum approved at the program level. Evidence-based practices, theories of learning, and developmentally appropriate strategies that underlie the teaching and learning processes related to planning, instruction, and assessment for Pre-K and K learners in inclusive settings and the associated curricular disciplines.

ELES 3020. Intermediate Assessment, Planning, and Instruction. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, ELED 3010, and minimum GAP of 2.75. Corequisite: ELED 3690, or practicum approved at the program level. The use of selected evidence-based practices and theories of learning processess related to assessment, planning, and instruction to meet the diverse and individualized needs of students in grades 4-5.

ELES 3210. Introduction to the Management of Learning Environments. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and minimum GPA of 2.75. Corequisite: ELED 3690, or a practicum approved at the program level. Fundamentals of creating classroom environments that are conducive to learning. The course will focus on individual and group management strategies that facilitate inclusion of students with disabilities in the classroom and basic behavior management principles for students in grades P-5.

Interpreting

INTP 2998. Entry into the Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". A required non-credit course for all interpreting candidates pursuing a VSU-recommended program of study. The course must be successfully completed prior to admission to professional coursework. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that additional program admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an "Unsatisfactory" grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a "Satisfactory" grade is received.

INTP 3010. Introduction to ASL - English Interpretation. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 2120 and INTP 2998. An overview of the field of interpreting which examines the role of ASL/English interpreters in a variety of settings in which they work including education, medical, legal, social service, and other settings. It provides an in-depth analysis and application of the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct and ethical decision making.

INTP 3150. English - ASL Translation. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, and ASLS 2130. A skills-oriented course designed to provide students with practice translating English to ASL and ASL to English. The primary focus of the class will be on the process of translation, i.e.; analysis, transfer and reformulation of the source text in the target language when there is substantial time to consider language form and function, cultural parallelism and pragmatic aspects and pragmatic aspects of the translation. Students will engage in practice of meaning analysis, written transcription and signed and spoken translation.

INTP 4010. Consecutive English/American Sign Language Interpreting. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, ASLS 3140, ASLS 3180, INTP 3010, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. A skills class designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and enhance their interpreting skills. The course emphasizes techniques for interpreting spoken instructional and non-instructional activities into ASL.

INTP 4020. Consecutive American Sign Language/English Interpreting. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, ASLS 3140, ASLS 3180, INTP 3010, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. A study of the principles and problems relating to interpreting a signed message from the deaf individual into its spoken English equivalent. Emphasis is placed on word choice, register, inflection, clarity, tone, and intent of the message.

INTP 4030. Consecutive Transliterating English to English Sign Systems. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, ASLS 3140, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. A skills course focusing on transliterating skills. Emphasis is placed on techniques for transliterating instructional and non-instructional classes and activities found in the public school system. Particular attention is given to the use of English sign systems as they relate to subject matter that requires an English-based sign system (English, reading, and related language skills courses).

INTP 4040. Practicum for Educational Interpreters. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4000, ASLS 3140, 3180, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. Structured observation of professional interpreters and an opportunity to acquire additional knowledge and skills related to the interpreting profession. A field experience is required.

INTP 4050. Simultaneous English/American Sign Language Interpreting I. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4010, 4020, 4030, INTP 4040, and ASLPI level 2 or higher. An extension of INTP 4010. This course is designed to strengthen the skills of advanced level students so that they are able to interpret accurately a spoken message into ASL.

INTP 4060. Simultaneous American Sign Language Interpreting/English. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4010, 4020, 4030, INTP 4040, and ASLPI Level 2 or higher. A continuation of INTP 4020. This course is designed to strengthen the skills of advanced-level students to interpret accurately information presented in American Sign Language into appropriate spoken English. Emphasis continues to be placed on word choice, register, inflection, clarity, tone, and intent of the message.

INTP 4070. Simultaneous Transliterating English to English Sign Systems. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4010, 4020, 4030, INTP 4040, and ASLPI level 2 or higher. A continuation of INTP 4030. This course is designed to give students additional opportunities to enhance their transliterating skills. Emphasis is placed on techniques for transliterating instructional and non-instructional activities found in the public school system. Continued attention is given to increasing fluency and selecting sign choice equivalencies and structure which best match the spoken message.

INTP 4080. Educational Interpreting Internship. 6 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4000, 4010, 4020, 4030, 4040, and ASLPI level 2 or higher. An opportunity for students to apply their interpreting skills in the educational or other supervised setting. Sites for internships are selected where mentors are available to further promote student growth and development. Students become familiar with the duties and responsibilities or working interpreters.

Kinesiology and Physical Education

KSPE 1010. Mind, Body, Strength, and Fitness. 1 Hour.

Exercise sessions in the Fitness Center designed to improve strength, endurance, flexibility and overall health--the components of physical fitness. Varied forms of exercises (yoga, circuit training, aerobics, plyometrics, etc.) will be applied to improve overall health.

KSPE 1011. Personal Fitness. 1 Hour.

Designed for students who are motivated to improving fitness levels, managing body mass, and achieving optimal fitness by following a custom-made exercise plan.

KSPE 1015. Fundamentals of Yoga. 1 Hour.

Theory and practice of basic yoga postures, breathing practices, stretching and relaxtion techniques as a method of improve flexibiiity, decrease stress and improve physical and mental well-being.

KSPE 1020. Weight Training. 1 Hour.

A beginning course emphasizing proper weight lifting techniques and the benefits of weight training exercises. Students will train the major muscle groups. Attention is given to weight room safety, policies and procedures.

KSPE 1021. Intermediate Weight Training. 1 Hour.

Students learn and practice new weight lifting techniques and exercises with higher percentage of maxes.

KSPE 1022. Advanced Weight Training. 1 Hour.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission. Designed to learn power lifting and the Olympic lifts (the clean, the clean & jerk, and the snatch.).

KSPE 1030. Step Aerobics. 1 Hour.

A beginning level course in the activity of stepping. Students train towards being able to step up for 30 continuous minutes.

KSPE 1031. Intermediate Step Aerobics. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: KSPE 1030. An intermediate level course in the activity of stepping.

KSPE 1040. Fitness in Rhythms and Dance. 1 Hour.

An introduction to the development of rhythmic skills, aerobic activities, dance movements, and exercises to improve physical fitness.

KSPE 1050. Fitness Walking. 1 Hour.

Basic walking is used as a modality of exercise and instruction focuses on how walking can be used as a lifetime fitness activity. Students learn how to apply the basic principles of exercise and will be taught to monitor their pulse to assess exercise intensity.

KSPE 1060. Jogging. 1 Hour.

Jogging or running is used as the exercise modality. Attention is given to the various training methods that runners use to improve their performance.

KSPE 1070. Snow Skiing I. 1 Hour.

A series of lessons designed for beginning to advanced snow skier. A five day stay at an appropriate skiing location is required. A fee is required.

KSPE 1071. Snow Skiing II. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: KSPE 1070. For those who participated in KSPE 1070 and wish to make another ski trip. A fee is required.

KSPE 1080. Beginning Tennis. 1 Hour.

A beginning course in tennis stressing the basics of singles and doubles play. Attention is given to the performance of the basic strokes as well as to the history, rules, etiquette and strategies of play.

KSPE 1081. Intermediate Tennis. 1 Hour.

A continuation of KSPE 1080 designed for those who wish to learn more advanced techniques in the game of tennis. Attention is given to the improvement of the various strokes and to the development of advanced playing abilities.

KSPE 1090. Racquetball. 1 Hour.

A beginning course in racquetball emphasizing the basic rules and strategeies of play. Attention is given to the skills needed to participate successfully in the sport.

KSPE 1100. Beginning Badminton. 1 Hour.

A beginning course in badminton stressing the basic rules and strategies of play. Attention is given to the skills, needed to participate successfully in the sport.

KSPE 1110. Archery. 1 Hour.

Designed for beginning or novice archer. Basic techniques of indoor target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition will be taught.

KSPE 1120. Beginning Golf. 1 Hour.

A beginning course designed to teach the basics of the game of golf. Instruction focuses on the grip, stance and basic swing pattern. A fee is required.

KSPE 1121. Intermediate Golf. 1 Hour.

Provides instruction in all facets of the game of golf. Students work at mastering the basic skills by practicing various kinds of shots. A fee may be required.

KSPE 1150. Bowling. 1 Hour.

Instruction is directed to the history, terms, scoring and techniques of bowling. Fee may be required.

KSPE 1170. Karate. 1 Hour.

An introduction to the basics of Karate. Successful completion of the course requirements leads to yellow belt certification.

KSPE 1240. Beginning Swimming. 1 Hour.

Red Cross instruction to equip the individual with the basic water safety skills and knowledge in order to make him or her reasonably safe while in, on or near the water. Designed for the non-swimmer.

KSPE 1241. Intermediate Swimming. 1 Hour.

An introduction to a wide variety of swimming skills, surface dives, and turns.

KSPE 1260. Fitness Swimming. 1 Hour.

Principles and practices of distance and interval conditioning workouts. The course is designed to improve the skills of swimmers who already have a knowledge of swimming strokes.

KSPE 1270. Volleyball. 1 Hour.

A beginning course designed to teach the fundamental skills, strategies and team concepts of volleyball. Attention will be given to the mastery of skill development, rules, game etiquette, and historical information.

KSPE 1280. Techno Games and Exercise. 1 Hour.

Designed to improve moderate to vigorous physical activity as well as health-related fitness components through the use of gaming technology (dancing, fitness, sports, adventures, etc.).

KSPE 1290. Soccer. 1 Hour.

An introductory course designed to present the fundamental skills, strategies, and team concepts of soccer. Attention is given to the skills of dribbling, passing, shooting, trapping, heading and tackling.

KSPE 1300. Basketball. 1 Hour.

An introductory course designed to present the fundamental skills, strategies, and team concepts of basketball. Attention is given to the improvement of the student's existing skill level.

KSPE 1380. Special Topics: Physical Activity. 1-2 Hours.

Course designed to allow participation in special physical education activities not offered in the regular curriculum (May be repeated).

KSPE 1390. Varsity Athletics. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: Member of a VSU Varsity Athletics Team. Development of skills, techniques and strategies of athletic performance through participation in the intercollegiate varsity athletic program. May be taken once during any academic year, and may be repeated for credit. Does not meet physical education activity requirements for education majors.

KSPE 2000. Health and Wellness for Life. 2 Hours.

A course of study investigating the major health problems in modern society, with emphasis on methods of understanding and developing lifestyle changes for longer and healthier life. Information on topics such as alcohol, drugs, stress management, nutrition, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy and parenthood, cigarette and tobacco use, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases will be discussed.

KSPE 2010. Activities and Games for Coaches and Teachers. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Declared health and physical education major or permission of the department head. Instructional techniques primarily emphasizing elementary school physical education activities, dance, health-related fitness, and related content areas.

KSPE 2020. Coaching and Teaching Team Sports. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Declared health and physical education major or permission of the department head. Instructional techniques primarily emphasizing middle and secondary physical education activities, team sports, and related content areas.

KSPE 2070. Lifeguard Training. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Demonstrate swimming competency. Red Cross course to lead to certification as a lifeguard.

KSPE 2080. Water Safety Instructor. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Demonstrate swimming competency. Red Cross course to lead to certification as swimming instructor.

KSPE 2081. Lifeguard Instructor Training. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Red Cross Lifeguarding Certification. Ability to meet the standard on all skills in CPR and First Aid Courses. Leads to certification as a Red Cross Lifeguard Instructor.

KSPE 2150. First Aid - CPR. 2 Hours.

A study of the techniques of emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (adult, child, and infant) and accident prevention. Emphasis will be placed on examining the interrelationships among human behavior, the environment and accidents.

KSPE 2999. Entry to the Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be successfully completed prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an unsatisfactory grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a satisfactory grade is received.

KSPE 3101. Foundations & Technology in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Also offered as CHPE 3101. Prerequisite: KSPE 2999: The principles and scope of physical education, sport and physical education history and development, the importance of physical education, fitness measurement, as well as the technology use in health and physical education disciplines including, web research, email, and apple technologies.

KSPE 3141. First Aid/CPR and Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. 3 Hours.

Also offered as CHPE 3141. Prerequisite: KSPE 2999: Pertinent information relative to various techniques of emergency, first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (infant, child, and adult) and accident prevention. Students may obtain certification for American Red Cross CPR certification and first aid certification. Exposure to basic concepts and techniques related to physical activity and athletic injury prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation.

KSPE 3160. Special Topics in Exercise Science. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A flexible course of study dealing with current events or special topics in exercise science. May be repeated.

KSPE 3200. Nutrition for Health and Human Performance. 3 Hours.

Also offered as CHPE 3200. Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. An introduction to the characteristics of the essential dietary nutrients and their respective roles in the body. Emphasis is placed on the effects of nutritional practices on health and human performance.

KSPE 3301. Contemporary Health Issues. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. Pertinent information relative to selective health content areas, including death and dying, human sexuality, character education, violence, and mental and emotional health. Stress-related content will be infused into the mental and emotional health areas as well as many of the other content offerings in the course.

KSPE 3401. Instructional Planning and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. Provides the student with pertinent information relative to basic instructional and planning methodologies basic statistics, data analysis, assessment and evaluation procedures and instruments across the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains, and the application of this content within the health and physical education settings.

KSPE 3411. Human Movement Applications. 4 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999; Also offered as CHPE 3411. Information on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology relative to motor development and motor learning, coupled with functional anatomy as it pertains to the dynamics of human motion. Emphasis is placed on mechanical analysis of human movement.

KSPE 3420. Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999; Also offered as CHPE 3420. An understanding of how the body, from a functional standpoint, responds, adjusts, and adapts to exercise. Topics include bioenergetics, neuromuscular concepts, cardiorespiratory considerations, physical training, and environmental concerns involving physical activity, athletic performance, and health-related fitness.

KSPE 3450. Comprehensive Health Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999; An investigation of health content pertaining to nutrition, fitness, body weight/composition, alcohol, tobacco, drugs, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases, and cancer.

KSPE 3460. Health Education Methods and Materials. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. Pertinent information relative to selected health instructional techniques specifically addressed in the public school setting. Attention to learning activities appropriate for school health programs in elementary, middle grade, and secondary schools, health education models, health promotion, and related content specific issues included in school health curricula. Appropriate classroom management and motivational strategies for behavioral modification in health education. Opportunities for classroom teaching experiences with micro-teaching and public school health teaching episodes.

KSPE 3700. Elementary Physical Education Methods and Content. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. Designed to provide the student with information related to instruction in physical education methodologies and content for preschool through fifth grade public school students. Field experiences in the public schools are required.

KSPE 3911. Diversity in Sport and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. Introduction to physical education and sport for exceptional children and diverse populations. The course provides an overview of litigation and the passage of various federal laws pertaining to human diversity in physical education and sport, including diverse cultures, physical differences, communication diversity, behavior differences, sensory diversity, and family diversity. Field experience in the public schools are required.

KSPE 4220. Management of Physical Education Programs. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999; Also offered as CHPE 4220. A study of administrative theory and principles as they relate to the process of planning, organizing, supervision, personnel, budget, facility design, risk management, and other issues that are related to operating physical education and sport programs in educational and community settings.

KSPE 4580. Directed Study in Physical Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor and Department Head. Development of an in-depth study of an approved topic of interest related to the field of physical education.

KSPE 4710. Middle Grade & Secondary Physical Education Methods & Content. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: KSPE 2999. This is a check-point course, and check-point requirements must be met. Information related to instruction in physical education methodologies and content for middle grade and secondary public school students. Field experience in public schools are required.

KSPE 4780. Internship in Physical Education. 6 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of coursework and approval of department.

KSPE 4790. Student Teaching in Health and Physical Education. 10 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of all requirements to student teach as listed in the university's undergraduate catalog. Co-requisite: KSPE 4800.

KSPE 4800. Professional Practice Seminar. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Completion of all requirements to student teach as listed in the university's undergraduate catalog. Co-requisite: KSPE 4790. Reflection of educational practices and refinement of concepts emanating from student teaching experience. Presentations of electronic portfolios along with other related materials, including an exit exam, are required.

Literacy

LITR 3110. Emergent Literacy Through Children's Literature and the Arts. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3190, or a practicum approved at the program level. An integrated approach to incorporating emergent literacy skills with aesthetic appreciation and creative expression. Emphasis is on methods for using children’s literature and the fine arts to develop life-long readers.

LITR 3120. Early Literacy. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3190, or a practicum approved at the program level. Introduction to content, theoretical perspectives, and evidence-based strategies for teaching children in the primary grades to read and write. Major topics include the reading process, phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary. Teacher candidates are expected to plan and implement learned skills and knowledge in a PreK-K classroom.

LITR 3130. Developing Literacy. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; LITR 3110; LITR 3120; and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3690, or a practicum approved at the program level. Application of methods for teaching listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing in a P-5 classrooms. Instructional methods of processes for writing and comprehending various forms of texts; motivating students to read and write; developing vocabulary, comprehension strategies, and higher-order thinking; and applying technology are emphasized.

LITR 4120. Literacy Assessment and Applications. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; LITR 3110; LITR 3120; LITR 3130; and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Emphasizes diagnostic and assessment strategies for corrective instruction for struggling elementary readers and writers. The course includes causes of reading disability, methods of diagnosis, instructional methods for group and individual remedial work, strategies for successful test taking. Teacher candidates will be required to apply their learned skills in tutoring experiences.

Middle Grades Education

MGED 2000. Written and Verbal Communication for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Practice and application of techniques in verbal and written communication specifically for the middle and secondary classroom. The use of standardized English will be emphasized in speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

MGED 2999. Entry to the Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be success- fully completed prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an un- satisfactory grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a satisfactory grade is received.

MGED 3000. Special Topics in Middle Grades Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: MGED 2999. Studies of selected topics in middle grades education.

MGED 3020. Introduction to Standards, Planning, and Assessment. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course. Must be successfully completed prior to admission to the MGED professional program. An introduction to the basic principles of instructional design and lesson planning, emphasizing the interrelationships among content standards, instructional objectives, planning, and assessment. The course focuses on evidence-based practices and theories in middle grades instruction. A field experience is required.

MGED 3110. Integrating Technology in Middle Grades Education. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the MGE professional program. Focuses on advancing a learner's systematic, progressive migration to a student-centered, technology-empowered classroom. Central theme is integrating technology into the curriculum.

MGED 3210. Literature for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

A survey of literary forms appropriate for middle grades child (Grades 4-8). Emphasis is placed on methods of classification, selection and presentation of literature to children in the middle grades.

MGED 3220. Reading and Writing in the Content Areas for Middle Grades. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: MGED 2999 and admission to the MGED professional program. Designed for majors to acquire instructional strategies for including reading and writing in all content areas of middle grades curriculum.

MGED 3990. Development and Education of the Middle Grades Student, Part 1. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. This a check-point course and check-point requirements must be met. Nature and needs of middle grades students and how cultural forces, family, community, and school impact their development and education. Field experience required.

MGED 3991. Differentiated Classroom for Middle Grades. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. Study of how differentiating content, process, products, and assessment can impact student achievement of diverse populations. Emphasis is on developing the knowledge and skills to design a differentiated classroom and the ability to articulated the rationale and results of its implementation.

MGED 4000. Assessment for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: EDUC 2999. A study of the curriculum and assessment strategies needed for effective teaching and learning in the middle grades education classroom. Candidates will develop reliable and valid assessments, make instructional plans and decisions based on data, and measure students' mastery of learning.

MGED 4100. Mathematics Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) mathematics, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades mathematics in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4200. Science Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) science, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades science in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4300. Social Studies Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) social studies, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades social studies in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4400. Language Arts Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) language arts, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades language arts in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4500. Methods of Teaching Reading for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) reading, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades reading in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4620. Apprenticeship in Middle Grades Teaching. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the MGED professional program.

MGED 4790. Student Teaching in the Middle Grades. 10 Hours.

Prerequisites: MGED 2999 and completion of all requirements to student teach as listed in the University's undergraduate catalog. Co-requisite: MGED 4800.

MGED 4800. Professional Practices Seminar. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of all course work and a 2.5 GPA. Corequisite: MGED 4790. Reflection of educational practices and refinement of concepts emanating from student teaching experience.

MGED 4900. Directed Study in Middle Grades Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and a 3.0 GPA. Opportunity for intensive individual study in student's field of spe- cialization of an area peculiar to his or her needs.

Secondary Education 

SEED 2000. Written and Verbal Communication for Secondary Education Teachers. 3 Hours.

Practice and application of techniques in verbal and written communication specifically for the middle and secondary classroom. The use of standardized English will be emphasized in speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

SEED 2999. Entry to the Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be successfully completed prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an unsatisfactory grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a satisfactory grade is received.

SEED 3000. Issues and Trends in Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: SEED 2999. This a check-point course, and check-point requirements must be met. An advanced study of contemporary practices and problems in grades 6-12, with an emphasis placed on philosophy, multicuturalism, reflective practices, and management of time, resources, and students. Successful completion of a 40-hour middle school field experience in required.

SEED 3020. Introduction to Standards, Planning, and Assessment. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; Co-requisite: SEED 4610. An introduction to the basic principles of instructional design and lesson planning. The course emphasizes the interrelationships among content standards, instructional objectives, planning, and assessment. The course includes evidence-based practices and theories related to student learning. A field experience is required.

SEED 3991. Differentiated Instruction in Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course. A study of how differentiating content, process, products, and assessment can impact student achievement of diverse populations. Emphasis is on developing the knowledge and skills to design a differentiated classroom and exploring technology as a tool to enhance student learning.

SEED 4000. Assessment for Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course. A study of the curriculum and assessment strategies needed for effective teaching and learning in the secondary education classroom Candidates will develop reliable and valid assessments, make instructional plans and decisions based on data, and measure students' mastery of learning.

SEED 4010. Integrating Technology in Secondary Education. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: ACED 2400 and SEED 3000 or FLED 3500. Focus on advancing a learner's systematic, progressive migration to a student-centered, technology-empowered class. The course's central theme is integrating technology into the curriculum.

SEED 4100. Mathematics Methods for Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course. An examination of methods and materials appropriate in teaching mathematics in grades 6-12 in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

SEED 4200. Science Methods for Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course. An examination of methods and materials appropriate in teaching science in grades 6-12 in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience in required.

SEED 4300. social Studies Methods for Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course. An examination of methods and materials appropriate in teaching social studies in grades 6-12 in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

SEED 4400. English/Language Arts Methods for Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999. An examination of methods and materials appropriate in teaching composition, literature, and oral expression in grades 6-12 in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience in required.

SEED 4610. Secondary Education Practicum I. 1 Hour.

Prerequisites; Appropriate 2999 course; Co-requisite: SEED 3020. A supervised introductory teaching experience in grades 6-12. Debriefing seminars address the appropriateness of content, teaching strategies, management techniques, and professional behavior. Practicum I is the first course in a series of three scaffolded clinical experiences specific to the teaching field and certification sought.

SEED 4620. Secondary Education Practicum II. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course. A supervised intermediate teaching experience in grades 9-12. Debriefing seminars address the appropriateness of content, teaching strategies, management techniques, and professional behavior. Practicum II is the second course in a series of three scaffolded clinical experiences specific to the teaching field and certification sought.

SEED 4790. Student Teaching in Secondary Education. 10 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; Co-requisite: SEED 4800 and completion of all requirements to student teach as listed in the University's undergraduate catalog. Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". The culminating clinical experience specific to the teaching field and certification sought. Student teaching is a full-day, semester-long experience in which candidates fully engage in the processes of planning, instruction, and assessment under the immediate supervision of a mentor teacher and with the additional support of a university supervisor.

SEED 4800. Professional Practices Seminar. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999. Co-requisite: SEED 4790. Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". Reflection of educational practices and refinement of concepts emanating from student teaching experience.

SEED 4900. Special Topics in Secondary Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and a 3.0 GPA. Opportunity for intensive individual study in student's field of specialization.