Dr. Barbara Radcliffe, Department Head
Room 1045, Education Building

The Department of Middle, Secondary, Reading, and Deaf Education is a multidisciplinary department that offers the B.S.Ed. degree with a major in middle grades education, deaf education, or American sign language/English interpreting.

The department offers a program of study in middle grades education (grades 4-8) with candidates choosing two concentrations selected from language arts, mathematics, science, reading, or social studies. The programs provide experiences that allow preservice teachers to develop the content knowledge and pedagogical skills necessary for meeting the diverse needs of their future students. Emphasis is placed on student-centered and reflective approaches for communicating effectively, using the tools of inquiry, developing learning opportunities for all students, integrating technology into instruction, and fostering relationships within the larger community. A pre-professional degree is available in deaf and hard-of-hearing (P-12) with a professional degree available with a major in American sign language/interpreting. Candidates are prepared in areas of instruction, service, assessment, and multiple modes of communication.

Freshmen who are interested in initial teacher certification in secondary education (grades 6-12) will first complete a B.A. or B.S. degree in a content teaching field and then enter the Alternative Certification Track Master’s Program (ACT) in the Department of Middle, Secondary, Reading, and Deaf Education.

 American Sign Language Studies

ASLS 2110. American Sign Language I. 3 Hours.

Pre- or Corequisite: INTP 2998, DEAF 2998, or DEAF 2999. The first in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This course presents introductory components of ASL, including signs, fingerspelling, mime, body language, and facial expression. Information about the history of sign language and its existence in society today is also included. Skill focus is on recognition and recall of American Sign Language.

ASLS 2120. American Sign Language II. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 2110. The second in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This course presents additional components of ASL, including signs, fingerspelling, mime, body language, and facial expression. Skill focus is on recognition and recall of American Sign Language with emphasis on increasing speed and fluency.

ASLS 3140. Linguistics of American Sign Language. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: INTP 2998 and ASLS 3170 or permission of the instructor. An overview of structural linguistics, sociolinguistics, and pragmatics of American Sign Languages (ASL). Linguistic theories will be applied to both spoken English and ASL, with other examples being drawn from various languages. Special attention will be paid to phonological (including the application of phonological rules), morphological, lexical, syntactical, and discourse structures of ASL, as well as language variation and language change.

ASLS 3170. American Sign Language III. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 2120 and INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. The third in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This course is designed to increase recognition and recall skills in dialogue communication. American Sign Language idioms are also included as well as a deeper understanding of the grammar, syntax, and complexities within the language.

ASLS 3180. American Sign Language IV. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 3170 and INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. The fourth in a series of courses based on American Sign Language concepts and principles. This class is an advanced course in American Sign Language for students who have completed previous coursework in ASL. Emphasis is placed on the production of non-voiced, conversational, spontaneous, signed sentences. Continued attention is given to the development of recognition as well as recall skills. Sociolinguistics with specific reference to syntax and the role of non-manual markers and idioms are explored as well as the interplay between language and culture within the deaf community.

ASLS 3190. Fingerspelling, Numbers, & Classifiers. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ASLS 2120; INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. Concepts and principles of ASL, providing increased emphasis on receptive and expressive skills in discourse and narratives, with particular attention to fingerspelling, numbers, and classifiers.

 Deaf Education

DEAF 2998. Entry to the Profession for Minors. 0 Hours.

Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” A required non-credit course for all candidates pursuing a minor in deaf studies. The course must be completed in conjunction with ASLS 2110, ASLS 2120, or prior to admission to junior level courses.

DEAF 2999. Entry to the Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” A required non-credit course for all deaf education initial certification candidates pursuing a VSU-recommended program of study. The course must be successfully completed prior to or corequisite with the first semester of professional graduate-level courses listed in the program of study. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio, have passed or exempted the Regents’ exam, have a 2.5 GPA or higher, have a satisfactory criminal background check, and purchase liability insurance. If an “Unsatisfactory” grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a “Satisfactory” grade is received.

DEAF 3040. Legal and Ethical Issues for Deaf Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: DEAF 2999. A study of the legal and ethical aspects of special education and services for individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf with additional disabilities. Topics will include an overview of the U.S. legal system; discrimination, constitutional, statutory, and regulatory issues; and case law related to special education, with specific emphasis on deaf education.

DEAF 3100. Orientation to Deaf Education & Language Learning. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. An overview of the field of deaf education, with an emphasis on language development in children and adults who are deaf. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the ear, language modes, assessment instruments, and other topics pertinent to the field. Emphasis is placed on flexibility in using different modes of communication as they relate to stages of language development.

DEAF 3120. Learning, Cognition, and Social Development in Deaf Children. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: INTP 2998 or DEAF 2999. An introduction to the study of the growth and development of deaf and hard of hearing children and how being deaf may affect an individual’s educational, cognitive, and social development. The focus of this class is toward a general understanding of how being deaf or hard of hearing is influential in shaping the life experiences of individuals. Various perspectives regarding being deaf will be explored and examined in light of general theories of psychological and social development.

DEAF 3150. Deaf Community, Culture, & History. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites ASLS 3170, ASLS 3180, and INTP 2998 of DEAF 2999. Overview of the historical and cultural aspects of the Deaf community and the patterns of social change during the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will be exposed to ASL literature, including folklore, fiction, nonfiction, and drama.

DEAF 4050. Manual Communication. 3 Hours.

An introduction to manual communication. Emphasis is placed on skill development in the use of American Sign Language. Open as an elective to all undergraduate majors.

 Interpreting

INTP 2998. Entry into the Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". A required non-credit course for all interpreting candidates pursuing a VSU-recommended program of study. The course must be successfully completed prior to admission to professional coursework. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that additional program admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an "Unsatisfactory" grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a "Satisfactory" grade is received.

INTP 3010. Introduction to ASL - English Interpretation. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ASLS 2120 and INTP 2998. An overview of the field of interpreting which examines the role of ASL/English interpreters in a variety of settings in which they work including education, medical, legal, social service, and other settings. It provides an in-depth analysis and application of the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct and ethical decision making.

INTP 3150. English - ASL Translation. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, and ASLS 3170. A skills-oriented course designed to provide students with practice translating English to ASL and ASL to English. The primary focus of the class will be on the process of translation, i.e.; analysis, transfer and reformulation of the source text in the target language when there is substantial time to consider language form and function, cultural parallelism and pragmatic aspects and pragmatic aspects of the translation. Students will engage in practice of meaning analysis, written transcription and signed and spoken translation.

INTP 4010. Consecutive English/American Sign Language Interpreting. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, ASLS 3140, ASLS 3180, INTP 3010, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. A skills class designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and enhance their interpreting skills. The course emphasizes techniques for interpreting spoken instructional and non-instructional activities into ASL.

INTP 4020. Consecutive American Sign Language/English Interpreting. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, ASLS 3140, ASLS 3180, INTP 3010, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. A study of the principles and problems relating to interpreting a signed message from the deaf individual into its spoken English equivalent. Emphasis is placed on word choice, register, inflection, clarity, tone, and intent of the message.

INTP 4030. Consecutive Transliterating English to English Sign Systems. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, ASLS 3140, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. A skills course focusing on transliterating skills. Emphasis is placed on techniques for transliterating instructional and non-instructional classes and activities found in the public school system. Particular attention is given to the use of English sign systems as they relate to subject matter that requires an English-based sign system (English, reading, and related language skills courses).

INTP 4040. Practicum for Educational Interpreters. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4000, ASLS 3140, 3180, and ASLPI level 1+ or higher. Structured observation of professional interpreters and an opportunity to acquire additional knowledge and skills related to the interpreting profession. A field experience is required.

INTP 4050. Simultaneous English/American Sign Language Interpreting I. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4010, 4020, 4030, INTP 4040, and ASLPI level 2 or higher. An extension of INTP 4010. This course is designed to strengthen the skills of advanced level students so that they are able to interpret accurately a spoken message into ASL.

INTP 4060. Simultaneous American Sign Language Interpreting/English. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4010, 4020, 4030, INTP 4040, and ASLPI Level 2 or higher. A continuation of INTP 4020. This course is designed to strengthen the skills of advanced-level students to interpret accurately information presented in American Sign Language into appropriate spoken English. Emphasis continues to be placed on word choice, register, inflection, clarity, tone, and intent of the message.

INTP 4070. Simultaneous Transliterating English to English Sign Systems. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4010, 4020, 4030, INTP 4040, and ASLPI level 2 or higher. A continuation of INTP 4030. This course is designed to give students additional opportunities to enhance their transliterating skills. Emphasis is placed on techniques for transliterating instructional and non-instructional activities found in the public school system. Continued attention is given to increasing fluency and selecting sign choice equivalencies and structure which best match the spoken message.

INTP 4080. Educational Interpreting Internship. 6 Hours.

Prerequisites: INTP 2998, 3010, 4000, 4010, 4020, 4030, 4040, and ASLPI level 2 or higher. An opportunity for students to apply their interpreting skills in the educational or other supervised setting. Sites for internships are selected where mentors are available to further promote student growth and development. Students become familiar with the duties and responsibilities or working interpreters.

 Literacy

LITR 3110. Emergent Literacy Through Children's Literature and the Arts. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3190, or a practicum approved at the program level. An integrated approach to incorporating emergent literacy skills with aesthetic appreciation and creative expression. Emphasis is on methods for using children’s literature and the fine arts to develop life-long readers.

LITR 3120. Early Literacy. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course, and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3190, or a practicum approved at the program level. Introduction to content, theoretical perspectives, and evidence-based strategies for teaching children in the primary grades to read and write. Major topics include the reading process, phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary. Teacher candidates are expected to plan and implement learned skills and knowledge in a PreK-K classroom.

LITR 3130. Developing Literacy. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; LITR 3110; LITR 3120; and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Co-requisite: ELED 3690, or a practicum approved at the program level. Application of methods for teaching listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing in a P-5 classrooms. Instructional methods of processes for writing and comprehending various forms of texts; motivating students to read and write; developing vocabulary, comprehension strategies, and higher-order thinking; and applying technology are emphasized.

LITR 4120. Literacy Assessment and Applications. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course; LITR 3110; LITR 3120; LITR 3130; and a minimum GPA of 2.75. Emphasizes diagnostic and assessment strategies for corrective instruction for struggling elementary readers and writers. The course includes causes of reading disability, methods of diagnosis, instructional methods for group and individual remedial work, strategies for successful test taking. Teacher candidates will be required to apply their learned skills in tutoring experiences.

Middle Grades Education

MGED 2999. Entry to the Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be success- fully completed prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an un- satisfactory grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a satisfactory grade is received.

MGED 3000. Special Topics in Middle Grades Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: MGED 2999. Studies of selected topics in middle grades education.

MGED 3020. Introduction to Standards, Planning, and Assessment. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Appropriate 2999 course. Must be successfully completed prior to admission to the MGED professional program. An introduction to the basic principles of instructional design and lesson planning, emphasizing the interrelationships among content standards, instructional objectives, planning, and assessment. The course focuses on evidence-based practices and theories in middle grades instruction. A field experience is required.

MGED 3110. Integrating Technology in Middle Grades Education. 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the MGE professional program. Focuses on advancing a learner's systematic, progressive migration to a student-centered, technology-empowered classroom. Central theme is integrating technology into the curriculum.

MGED 3210. Literature for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

A survey of literary forms appropriate for middle grades child (Grades 4-8). Emphasis is placed on methods of classification, selection and presentation of literature to children in the middle grades.

MGED 3220. Reading and Writing in the Content Areas for Middle Grades. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: MGED 2999 and admission to the MGED professional program. Designed for majors to acquire instructional strategies for including reading and writing in all content areas of middle grades curriculum.

MGED 3990. Development and Education of the Middle Grades Student, Part 1. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. This a check-point course and check-point requirements must be met. Nature and needs of middle grades students and how cultural forces, family, community, and school impact their development and education. Field experience required.

MGED 3991. Differentiated Classroom for Middle Grades. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. Study of how differentiating content, process, products, and assessment can impact student achievement of diverse populations. Emphasis is on developing the knowledge and skills to design a differentiated classroom and the ability to articulated the rationale and results of its implementation.

MGED 4000. Development and Education of the Middle Grades Student, Part 2. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the MGED professional program. Study of the curriculum needs of middle grades student. Emphasis on curriculum as it relates to the unique transi- tional needs of middle grades students. Areas addressed are curricular planning, construction, and materials selec- tion. Part of professional program and all courses in Block A must be taken together.

MGED 4100. Mathematics Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) mathematics, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades mathematics in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4200. Science Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) science, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades science in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4300. Social Studies Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) social studies, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades social studies in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4400. Language Arts Methods for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) language arts, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades language arts in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4500. Methods of Teaching Reading for Middle Grades Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 2999 course and admission to the MGED professional program; Co-requisite: MGED 4620. An examination of teaching methods in middle grades (4th-8th) reading, emphasizing principles and methods for teaching concepts, skills, and relationships in middle grades reading in accordance with national and state standards. A field experience is required.

MGED 4620. Apprenticeship in Middle Grades Teaching. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the MGED professional program.

MGED 4790. Student Teaching in the Middle Grades. 10 Hours.

Prerequisites: MGED 2999 and completion of all requirements to student teach as listed in the University's undergraduate catalog. Co-requisite: MGED 4800.

MGED 4800. Professional Practices Seminar. 2 Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of all course work and a 2.5 GPA. Corequisite: MGED 4790. Reflection of educational practices and refinement of concepts emanating from student teaching experience.

MGED 4900. Directed Study in Middle Grades Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and a 3.0 GPA. Opportunity for intensive individual study in student's field of spe- cialization of an area peculiar to his or her needs.

Secondary Education 

SEED 2999. Entry to the Education Profession. 0 Hours.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A required non-credit course for all teacher education candidates pursuing a VSU recommendation for initial certification; must be successfully completed prior to admission to teacher education. Candidates are required to establish an electronic portfolio and provide evidence that all teacher education admission requirements have been satisfactorily met. If an unsatisfactory grade is earned, the course must be repeated until a satisfactory grade is received.

SEED 3000. Issues and Trends in Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: SEED 2999. This a check-point course, and check-point requirements must be met. An advanced study of contemporary practices and problems in grades 6-12, with an emphasis placed on philosophy, multicuturalism, reflective practices, and management of time, resources, and students. Successful completion of a 40-hour middle school field experience in required.

SEED 4010. Integrating Technology in Secondary Education. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: ACED 2400 and SEED 3000 or FLED 3500. Focus on advancing a learner's systematic, progressive migration to a student-centered, technology-empowered class. The course's central theme is integrating technology into the curriculum.

SEED 4100. Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Secondary English. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PSYC 3110 & SEED 3000. Synthesis of all previous education courses. Students are required to develop inquiry-based, problem-centered, developmentally appropriate interdisciplinary curriculum and activities that incorporate technology and authentic assessment strategies. The course also includes the study of adolescent literature as part of secondary curriculum. Successful completion of a 40-hour secondary school field experiences required.

SEED 4200. Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Secondary Mathematics. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PSYC 3110 & SEED 3000. Synthesis of all previous education courses. Students are required to develop inquiry-based, problem-centered, developmentally appropriate interdisciplinary curriculum and activities that incorporate technology and authentic assessment strategies. The course also includes examination and evaluation of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards. Successful completion of a 40-hour secondary school field experience is required.

SEED 4300. Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Secondary Science. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PSYC 3110 & SEED 3000. Synthesis of all previous education courses. Students are required to develop inquiry-based, problem-centered, developmentally appropriate interdisciplinary curriculum and activities that incorporate technology and authentic assessment strategies. Successful completion of a 40-hour secondary school field experience is required.

SEED 4400. Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Secondary Social Studies. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PSYC 3110 & SEED 3000. Synthesis of all previous education courses. Students are required to develop inquiry-based, problem-centered, developmentally appropriate interdisciplinary curriculum and activities that incorporate technology and authentic assessment strategies. Successful completion of a 40-hour secondary school field experience is required.

SEED 4620. Linking Classrooms with Careers. 1 Hour.

Prerequisite: SEED 3000 and senior standing. Successful completion of an 80-hour field experience that emphasizes educational applications and connections between businesses/industries and schools.

SEED 4790. Student Teaching. 10 Hours.

Prerequisite: SEED 2999 and completion of all requirements to student teach as listed in the University's undergraduate catalog. Corequisite: SEED 4800.

SEED 4800. Professional Practices Seminar. 2 Hours.

Co-requisite: SEED 4790.

SEED 4900. Special Topics in Secondary Education. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and a 3.0 GPA. Opportunity for intensive individual study in student's field of specialization.