Dr. Darrell Ross, Head
Suite 1004, Nevins Hall

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice offers programs that lead to either the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in sociology and anthropology or the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in criminal justice. The Applied and Clinical Sociology Program is accredited by the Commission on Applied and Clinical Sociology. Minors are offered in sociology, anthropology, and Native American Studies. The department also offers, at the graduate level, the Master of Science degree with a major in sociology and the Master of Science degree with a major in criminal justice.

The mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice includes 1) helping students gain an understanding of the structures and processes through which individuals participate in society, 2) supporting students in developing an understanding of human behavior, 3) preparing students for a wide range of careers in sociology, anthropology, human resources, human services, and criminal justice systems, and 4) working with students who wish to pursue graduate work in the social sciences. The department seeks to fulfill its mission by offering courses both for students majoring or minoring in its programs as well as by supporting the core curriculum of the University and students from other programs who need courses from the department. In addition, the department seeks to emphasize the importance of critical thinking skills, an appreciation of diverse cultural perspectives and lifestyles, and the application of knowledge to the development of policy and the solution of social problems.

Sociology

SOCI 1101. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of sociology, focusing on basic concepts, theories, and methods of research and inquiry. Emphasis is on applying the sociological perspective to understanding social inequalities and social stratification, culture, social institutions and groups, social change, and the relation to the individual to society.

SOCI 1101H. Introduction to Sociology, Honors. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of sociology, at the honors level, focusing on basic concepts, theories, and methods of research and in- quiry. Emphasis is on applying the sociological perspective to understanding social inequalities and social stratifica- tion, culture, social institutions and groups, social change, and the relation of the individual to society.

SOCI 1160. Introduction to Social Problems. 3 Hours.

An analysis of major national and international social problems, using the sociological perspective. Sociological principles, theories, and methods will be used in data interpretation, analysis of ideologies, and evaluation of social policy.

SOCI 3000. Sociological Analysis and Statistical Applications. 4 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160. An introduction to the foundations of sociology and anthropology as well as basic statistical analysis. The course will examine social scientific research design including conceptualization, operationalization, problem definition, database management, and sampling. Data analysis will include descriptive, inferential, and multivariate statistics and use data analysis software. Computer laboratory periods required.

SOCI 3060. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. An introduction to the sociology of race and eth- nic relations. A study of systems of social inequalities based upon race and ethnic divisions in society. Case studies including African-American and international ethnic conflicts are explored.

SOCI 3090. Mass Media and Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. A sociological analysis of the impact of mass media and popular culture on individuals and groups in such areas as violence, consumerism, political participa- tion, social deviation, and interpersonal communication.

SOCI 3150. Sociology of Religion. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. The study of religion as one of the basic institu- tions in society. The course will cover the functions of religion within society; problems and conflicts within religion, such as racism and sexism; and how religion is expressed by persons in a variety of groups and cultures.

SOCI 3190. Clinical Sociology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. Introduces students to the skills needed for di- rect work with clients, such as effective engagement, active listening, interviewing, assessment and goal setting, and ethical concerns. Focus is placed on the whole person and the sociological model of assessment.

SOCI 3200. Applied Sociology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. An analysis of the approaches and techniques used by sociologists and human service workers in applied/clini- cal settings. Emphasis on sociological principles and their application in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals and groups. Applied/clinical sociology as a profession as well as ethical issues will also be addressed.

SOCI 3350. Social Deviance. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. A study of the nature and dimension of deviance in society, with special emphasis on the problems of def- inition, identification, explanation, and social reaction. Specific forms of deviance, including the construction of deviant identities and deviant careers, will be dis- cussed.

SOCI 3500. Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or 1160. An essentially historical survey of the development of sociological theory. Strategies of theory building and conducting research will also be considered. Students will develop a competent review of literature in an area of sociology.

SOCI 3510. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

An introduction to social research techniques with an emphasis on firsthand data collection. Project work introduces students to issues in research design, ethical concerns, conceptualization, sampling, data analysis, interpretation of research results, report writing, and application of research findings. We will taught in electronic classrooms, as facility availability permits.

SOCI 3650. Sociology of Sport. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. The study and analysis of the spectacle, business, and power of sport in society. Coursework examines both the socially integrative and disintegrative aspects of sport as institution. Includes international analysis and multicult- ural examples.

SOCI 3710. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. A sociological analysis of the relationship be- tween social situational influences and individual behavior. Survey of social psychological theories as they relate to social perception, attitudes and behaviors, group pro- ductivity, prejudice, and socialization.

SOCI 3750. Medical Sociology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. An analysis of the social processes affecting conditions of health and disease and the cluster of social relationships and organizations that comprise the in- stitution of medicine. Emphasis on social and cultural factors which influence definitions of health and illness, causes, preventions, and treatments, cross cultural comparisons, stress, delivery of health care, and health care professionals.

SOCI 3800. Social Stratification. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. A study of systems of stratification, including race, class, and gender. Course includes exploration of research, concepts, and theories in the study of social class, race, and gender and the effect these systems have on power, life chances, and social mobility in our society. A primary focus of the course is the explana- tion of social inequality.

SOCI 3900. Environment and Society. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of the instructor. An examination of environmental problems within their sociological context. Topics include sustainable development, global population change, energy and society, the environmental movement, globalization, and current environmental policy discussion.

SOCI 4100. Family Sociology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. An analysis of the institution of family in con- temporary society. Emphasis is on understanding the historical development of current family systems; a sociological analysis of family dynamics; the interaction between family and other institutions; the connection between family and systems of social class, race, and gender; and current family problems and issues.

SOCI 4200. Organizations and Work. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. Sociological study of the nature of work within formal and informal organizations. Course includes a study of the relationship between occupations and careers, the social organization of work in bureaucracies, voluntary organizations, theory and concepts associated with the study of organizations, and individual strategies for career study.

SOCI 4300. Population Problems. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of the instructor. An examination of population issues within their sociological context. These include the study of demography, food problems, hunger, environmental decline, immigration, HIV/AIDS crisis, epidemiology, fertility and family planning, population aging, global inequality and economic development, and the consequences of globalization.

SOCI 4540. Internship in Sociology. 3-9 Hours.

Prerequisites: Students must be in good academic standing; have a minimum of 90 credit hours earned; and have successfully completed or be concurrently enrolled in SOCI 3000, 3190, 3200, 3500, and 3510; or permission of the Internship Coordinator. An application for Internship must be completed by midterm of the semester before enrollment. Graded ¿Satisfactory¿ or ¿Unsatisfactory.¿ Supervised on-site experience in an appropriate community, government, or private organization for students who are completing the applied/clinical sociology concentration. Professionalism, workforce transition, and application of sociological knowledge and skills are emphasized.

SOCI 4550. Poverty and Social Welfare. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. An examination of the history, causes, and consequences of poverty in the US. Also discussed will be the history, philosophy, policies, programs, concepts, and practices in the field of social welfare.

SOCI 4680. Sociology of Gender. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. A micro and macro analysis of the social construc- tion of gender and its resulting inequalities in the major areas of contemporary society, including the economic, family, and political institutions.

SOCI 4800. Issues in Sociological Practice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160. The application of sociological knowledge to specific topics within sociological practice. These will include but are not limited to the following: Domestic Violence, Rural Sociology, Environmental Sociology, Family Stress and Trauma, and Drug Use and Drug Policy. May be taken concurrently with SOCI 4810. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

SOCI 4810. Issues in Sociological Practice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160. The application of sociological knowledge to specific topics within sociologi- cal practice. These will include but are not limited to the following: Social Gerontology, Child Welfare, Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Community Development, and Nonprofit Organizations. May be taken concurrently with SOCI 4800. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

SOCI 4900. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of instructor. Topics vary. Designed to provide an intensive study in a current topic relevant to sociology. May be repeated for credit.

SOCI 4980. Directed Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160 or permission of in- structor. Study in an area or subject not normally found in established courses offered by the department; may also allow the student to explore in more detail a topic which is normally covered by the department. May be repeated for credit.

SOCI 4990. Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of SOCI 3000, the Foundation courses, and a minimum of 6 hours of departmental concentration courses. An application for Capstone must be completed by midterm of the semester before enrollment. Summative end of program. Designed to enhance the student's undergraduate sociological or anthropological studies through involvement in guided research or field experience. Students will be required to write and present a senior paper.

Anthropology

ANTH 1102. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the origins, evolution, and present-day adaptations of the world’s peoples. Emphasis on the study of fossils, archaeological remains, and culturally diverse life ways.

ANTH 1102H. Introduction to Anthropology, Honors. 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of anthropology, with particular focus on such disciplinary subfields as physical anthropology, archaeology, and cultural anthropology. Emphasis is on the employment of the anthropological perspective, and the application of anthropological concepts and models to contemporary issues and problems.

ANTH 3010. Physical Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. The study of the biological origins of the human species. An emphasis is placed on human evolution, genetics, primatology, and the interaction between culture and biology.

ANTH 3020. Culture and Personality. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. A cross-cultural survey of the relationship between culture and personality. Attention is directed to the interplay of cultural and social variables in the development of identity. Specific foci include mental illness, aggression, altered states of consciousness, and individual adaptation to social change.

ANTH 3030. Archaeological Techniques. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the theory and techniques of archaeology as well as their practical application. Students will participate in fieldwork, including archaeological survey, excavation, and laboratory analysis.

ANTH 3040. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the nature of cultural anthropology through a cross-cultural analysis of cultural systems and social organizations. Specific theoretical approaches are applied to case materials from cultural systems around the world including those within our society.

ANTH 3070. Magic, Religion, and Witchcraft. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. A cross-cultural survey of varieties of religious expression. Emphasis is placed on ritual, mythic, and symbolic dimensions of religion and the way religion interrelates with other social institutions.

ANTH 3090. Africa: Inequalities Past and Present. 3 Hours.

Also Offered as AFAM 3090. Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. The study and problems of social stratification in Africa from pre-colonial to modern times. Special attention will be paid to both intranational institutions (e.g., kinship, class, and ethnicity) and international political economy.

ANTH 3120. Archaeology of Eastern North America. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. A study of cultural development in eastern North America, employing archaeological, ethnohistorical, and historical perspectives. The temporal boundaries are the arrival of humans in the region until the nineteenth century. Native American and Euroamerican culture history will be explored.

ANTH 3130. Indians of North America. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. A survey of the lifestyles of North American Indians following contact with Europeans. Groups from all regions of North America are included, and the course examines native lifestyles at particular points in time. Primary emphasis is on environmental adaptation and economy of each group; in addition, social and political organization, religion, material culture, arts, and other aspects of culture are discussed.

ANTH 3140. World Prehistory. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. A survey of world prehistory from the earliest human ancestors to early civilizations. Topics include human evolution, the spread of humans over the globe, the development of plant and animal domestication, and the development of civilization.

ANTH 3160. Experimental Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. An introduction to primitive technology with an emphasis on recreating past tools and utensils in an attempt to understand past lifeways. Lab fee required.

ANTH 3170. Language and Culture. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. A survey of the relationship between language and culture. The course introduces concepts for understanding linguistic anthropology and language mechanics.

ANTH 3500. Anthropological Theory. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 3000. An historical survey of the development of anthropological theory, with a primary focus on the anthropological perspective and including an introduction to general social science. Students will develop a competent review of literature in an area of anthropology.

ANTH 3510. Anthropological Research. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: SOCI 3000. An introduction to the concepts and methods of anthropological research. The emphasis is on developing familiarity with the various research strategies employed by cultural anthropologists and their application. Course work culminates with the design of a research proposal.

ANTH 3910. Anthropology of Law. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. The study of legal systems and conflict resolution styles in nonWestern societies. The varieties of legal understandings and procedures are explored, and characteristics of specific legal processes are related to other institutional spheres, such as economics, kinship, and religion.

ANTH 4040. Sociocultural Change. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. An examination of sociocultural changes occurring in tribal and peasant societies in response to modernization. Particular attention is focused on the articulation of these societies with the larger national and global systems, the resulting inequalities, types of social and cultural disruptions experienced, and the range of responses to change.

ANTH 4540. Internship in Anthropology. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of advisor and Internship Coordinator. Must be taken concurrently with SOCI 4990 Senior Capstone. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” Supervised, practical experience in an appropriate community agency; an opportunity for students of demonstrated maturity and judgment to discover the integration between theory and practice and make applications.

ANTH 4900. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. Topics vary. Designed to provide an intensive study in a current topic relevant to anthropology. May be repeated for credit.

ANTH 4980. Directed Study in Anthropology. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisites: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. Study in an area or subject not normally found in established courses offered by the department; may also allow the student to explore in more detail a topic which is normally covered by the department. May be repeated for credit.

Criminal Justice

CRJU 1100. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the structure, functions, and operations of criminal justice agencies, including the police, the courts, and corrections.

CRJU 2500. Written Communications in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

The practice of writing the various types of reports used in the criminal justice system. Producing accurate and complete documents for use in court and other administrative, investigative, and procedural processes will be emphasized.

CRJU 3100. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

Offers an overview of both substantive and procedural law related to the definitions, investigations, processing, and punishment of crimes. The course will introduce students to the legal idea of criminal responsibility, the concept and elements of criminal responsibility, required state of mind (mens rea), and prohibited conduct (actus reus). The course discusses the substantive content, structure, and sources of major crimes against persons and property and provides a comprehensive evaluation of various legal defenses to criminal liability under both common law (case law) and statutory law (legislative law) approaches.

CRJU 3110. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

CRJU 3200. Criminology. 3 Hours.

A study of the nature and scope of crime in society with an emphasis on criminological theories.(S) Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

CRJU 3250. Crime and the Media. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the role the mass media has on human behavior, subsequently affecting human judgment, attitudes, perceptions of crime, and societal reactions to crime in general. This course analyzes how the general public processes the "criminal event" and other pertinent information regarding crime and how this process is fundamentally derived from the media and is an instrumental element in the creation of fear of crime.

CRJU 3300. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and 2500 or permission of the instructor. A study of the source and development of criminal law, its application, interpretation, and enforcement, and an analysis of Supreme Court decisions to emphasize problems in due process.

CRJU 3310. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and 2500 or permission of the instructor. A study of the nature and function of the law with relation to the criminal processes, and policies and procedures in the administration of criminal justice. Special attention will be given to United States Supreme Court decisions that govern criminal procedures.

CRJU 3400. Juvenile Delinquency and Justice. 3 Hours.

Reviews the juvenile justice system, including the impact of Supreme Court decisions, and examines the theories of juvenile delinquency and the implication of those theories for preventing and controlling juvenile deviance. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

CRJU 3401. Criminal Justice Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and 2500 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to criminal justice data analysis including the logic of science, operationalization, sampling, coding, data entry, data file management, and microcomputer processing of research information. Will be taught in an electronic classroom, as facility availability permits.

CRJU 3402. Criminal Justice Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and 2500 or permission of instructor. An introduction to criminal justice research methodologies with an emphasis on firsthand data collection. Project work introduces students to issues in research design, ethical concerns, conceptualization, sampling, data analysis, interpretation of research results, report writing, and application of research findings. Students will use computer applications in the development of their projects.

CRJU 3600. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and 2500 or permission of the instructor. A study of the nature and scope of crime and delinquency in society with an emphasis on criminological theories. Study will include the application of theory as a foundation for conducting research.

CRJU 3700. Ethics in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and 2500 or permission of the instructor. Standards of conduct in law enforcement, the court system, and corrections. An examination of traditional and non-traditional criminal justice practices such as fidelity to office, discretion, covert operations, deadly force, affirmative action, political involvement, sentencing, incarceration, and the death penalty.

CRJU 4010. Comparative Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Area F Criminal Justice courses or permission of the instructor. A study and comparison of the world’s major justice systems.

CRJU 4100. Seminar in Law Enforcement. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2500 or permission of the instructor. An in-depth study of policies and procedures which govern law enforcement and major contemporary problems in law enforcement.

CRJU 4110. Forensic Criminology. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Area F Criminal Justice Courses or permission of the instructor. The scientific investigation of crime with emphasis on the collection, analysis, comparison, and identification of physical evidence.

CRJU 4200. Seminar in Corrections. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1000 and CRJU 2500 or permission of the instructor. An in-depth study of laws, policies, and procedures which govern corrections and major contemporary problems and issues in corrections.

CRJU 4400. Seminar in Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2500 or permission of the instructor. An in-depth examination of current issues surrounding the juvenile justice system in the State of Georgia and nationwide. Topics include treatment strategies and alternative rehabilitation programs.

CRJU 4500. Classification of Criminal Behavior. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. A study of the methods of identification and classification of specific criminal behavior types with an emphasis on violent offenders, sexual deviants, the anti-social personality, and the criminally insane.

CRJU 4610. White-Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. A forum for students to explore the nature and extent of white-collar crime in the U.S. and abroad. Students will critically review several explanatory models of the elite criminality, construct a typology of offenses, evaluate current criminal justice responses, and explore policy options for criminal justice administration.

CRJU 4620. Criminal Victimization. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to the study of victims of crime. The course will examine different areas related to the study of crime victims, including different types of crime victims, the role of the crime victim within the criminal justice system, reporting and data collection methods used to assess crime victims, and how crime victims are identified, confronted, and treated, both historically and in today’s criminal justice system.

CRJU 4630. Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. Basic concepts of crime prevention theories and techniques, with a special focus on the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Model. Students will study past and current techniques and programs to determine their effectiveness and how these can be used to establish crime prevention in today’s society.

CRJU 4640. Organized Crime. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. An examination of the history, nature, scope, and typologies of organized crime. Students will apply several theories in order to better understand the development of organized crime. In addition, students will critically evaluate the criminal justice system response to the problem of organized crime.

CRJU 4650. Sex Crimes. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. A study of sex offenses, including nuisance and dangerous sex crimes, theoretical explanations for sex crimes, identification of and treatment for sex offenders, and the role of the criminal justice system in identifying, punishing, and preventing sex crimes.

CRJU 4660. Issues in Cybercrime. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of the instructor. An examination of the extent of illegal activities occurring in cyberspace. The course reviews the varieties of cybercrime and discusses legal issues in the investigation and prosecutions of cybercrimes.

CRJU 4670. Terrorism. 3 Hours.

An analysis of the various forms of terrorism and the organizations that carry out terrorist activities. Students will use a criminological framework to review the theoretical causes and historical development of terrorist organizations. Students will also examine the criminal justice system’s response to terrorist activities.

CRJU 4680. Native American and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Also offered as NAS 4100. An examination of the Native American experience in terms of the American criminal justice system. Cultural conflict, poverty, colonization, forced assimilation, and deculturalization will be examined as possible sources of crime in the Native American community. Further, the subject of victimization, as well as that of the importation of crime patterns and behaviors, will be explored.

CRJU 4690. History of Crime in the United States. 3 Hours.

An overview of the historical development of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States. This course examines the development of law enforcement, courts, corrections, and criminal behavior.

CRJU 4700. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Prerequisite: Area F Criminal Justice courses or permission of the instructor. An intensive study of a topic relevant to criminal justice.

CRJU 4800. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Prerequisites: CRJU 3300, CRJU 3310, CRJU 3401, CRJU 3402, CRJU 3600, CRJU 3700, CRJU 4100, CRJU 4200, CRJU 4400 and senior status or permission of the instructor. An application and integration of core and related criminal justice courses to contemporary criminal justice issues.

CRJU 4900. Directed Study in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Prerequisites: major in Criminal Justice; permission of the student’s advisor, the instructor, and the Criminal Justice coordinator or Department Head. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” A study in an area not covered in other criminal justice courses; allows the student to explore in more detail a topic which is normally covered in criminal justice courses. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

CRJU 4910. Internship in Criminal Justice. 3-6 Hours.

Prerequisites: major in Criminal Justice; permission of the student’s advisor, internship coordinator, and the coordinator Criminal Justice application: application forms must be submitted prior to midterm of the semester before internship. Graded “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory.” Supervised, practical experience in an appropriate criminal justice agency; an opportunity for students to demonstrate maturity and judgments to discover the integration between theory and practice.